Bariatric Outcomes are Significantly Improved in Hospitals with Fellowship Council-Accredited Bariatric Fellowships

Pamela S. Kim, Dana A. Telem, Maria S. Altieri, Mark Talamini, Jie Yang, Qiao Zhang, Aurora D. Pryor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: With the increasing demand of bariatric surgery, there is a need to train more surgeons, while identifying institutional factors associated with improved outcomes. Little is known regarding the impact of a fellowship training program on institutional outcomes. This study examines the effect of bariatric fellowship program status on perioperative outcomes within New York state. Methods: Using the New York statewide planning and research cooperative system, 47,342 adult patients in 91 hospitals were identified who underwent a laparoscopic bariatric surgery over a 6-year period. Hospitals with fellowships were identified from the Fellowship Council. Statistical comparison between patient demographics, payer source, comorbidities, bariatric procedure performed, and perioperative outcomes in hospitals with and without fellowship were performed. Results: On univariate analysis, fellowship accreditation status was found to be associated with increased rates of cardiac complications and shock and decreased rates of pneumonia. Overall complication rate was not significantly different in fellowship versus non-fellowship institutions. However, when controlled for patient demographic, payer source, comorbidity, and operative procedure, there were significantly improved bariatric outcomes among institutions with fellowship programs. Conclusions: The presence of a fellowship program correlates with improved hospital outcomes, mitigating potential concerns about possible negative effects of trainees on hospitals and patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)594-597
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Keywords

  • Bariatric surgery
  • Fellowship
  • Outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Gastroenterology

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