Banning smoking in a children's hospital: Are employees supportive

Diane M Becker, Harry F. Conner, H. Richard Waranch, Robert Swank, Weida Sara, Frank Oski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study surveyed 762 professional and auxiliary employees in a large urban children's hospital to assess readiness for a total ban on smoking. The prevalence of never smokers was 63.1%, former smokers was 21.1%, and current smokers was 15.1%. Among nonsmokers, 83% indicated that a children's hospital should be smoke-free. The attitudes of former smokers were almost identical to those of never smokers. Less than half of current smokers (43%) agreed with a ban on smoking which suggests some support for a smoke-free setting even among smokers. In multivariate analysis, smokers, however, were eight times less likely to agree with such a policy, independent of age, sex, and occupation. This study suggests that the majority of employees are supportive of a total ban on smoking but that special efforts to help smokers stop smoking may enhance the effectiveness of a policy banning smoking in a children's health care facility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-78
Number of pages7
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989

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Smoking
Smoke
Health Facilities
Urban Hospitals
Child Care
Occupations
Multivariate Analysis
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Banning smoking in a children's hospital : Are employees supportive. / Becker, Diane M; Conner, Harry F.; Waranch, H. Richard; Swank, Robert; Sara, Weida; Oski, Frank.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 18, No. 1, 1989, p. 72-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Becker, Diane M ; Conner, Harry F. ; Waranch, H. Richard ; Swank, Robert ; Sara, Weida ; Oski, Frank. / Banning smoking in a children's hospital : Are employees supportive. In: Preventive Medicine. 1989 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 72-78.
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