Ban on menthol-flavoured tobacco products predicts cigarette cessation at 1 year: A population cohort study

Michael O. Chaiton, Ioana Nicolau, Robert Schwartz, Joanna E Cohen, Eric Soule, Bo Zhang, Thomas Eissenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: The province of Ontario, Canada, banned the use of menthol-flavoured tobacco products as of 1 January 2017. The long-term impact of a menthol ban on smoking behaviour has not been previously evaluated. Methods: Population cohort study with baseline survey conducted September-December 2016 and follow-up January-August 2018 among residents of Ontario, Canada, 16 years old and over who reported current smoking (past 30 days) at baseline survey and completed follow-up (n=913) including 187 reporting smoking menthol cigarettes daily, 420 reported smoking menthol cigarettes occasionally, and 306 were non-menthol cigarette smokers. Relative rates of making a quit attempt and being a non-smoker at follow-up were estimated with Poisson regression controlling for smoking and demographic characteristics at baseline. Results: At follow-up, 63% of daily menthol smokers reported making a quit attempt since the ban compared with 62% of occasional menthol smokers and 43% of non-menthol smokers (adjusted relative rate (ARR) for daily menthol smokers compared with non-menthol smokers: 1.25; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.50). At follow-up, 24% of daily menthol smokers reported making a quit since the ban compared with 20% of occasional menthol smokers and 14% of non-menthol smokers (ARR for daily menthol smokers compared with non-menthol smokers: 1.62; 95% CI 1.08 to 2.42). Conclusions: The study found higher rates of quitting among daily and occasional menthol smokers in Ontario 1 year after the implementation of a menthol ban compared with non-menthol smokers. Our findings suggest that restrictions on menthol may lead to substantial improvements in public health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalTobacco control
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Menthol
ban
Tobacco Products
nicotine
smoking
Cohort Studies
Population
Smoking
Canada
Ontario
public health
resident
regression

Keywords

  • menthol ban
  • public policy
  • smoking cessation
  • tobacco products

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Ban on menthol-flavoured tobacco products predicts cigarette cessation at 1 year : A population cohort study. / Chaiton, Michael O.; Nicolau, Ioana; Schwartz, Robert; Cohen, Joanna E; Soule, Eric; Zhang, Bo; Eissenberg, Thomas.

In: Tobacco control, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chaiton, Michael O. ; Nicolau, Ioana ; Schwartz, Robert ; Cohen, Joanna E ; Soule, Eric ; Zhang, Bo ; Eissenberg, Thomas. / Ban on menthol-flavoured tobacco products predicts cigarette cessation at 1 year : A population cohort study. In: Tobacco control. 2019.
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