Baltimore Reading and Eye Disease Study (BREDS): compliance and satisfaction with glasses usage

Amy H. Huang, Xinxing Guo, Lucy I. Mudie, Rebecca Wolf, Josephine Owoeye, Michael X Repka, David S Friedman, Robert E. Slavin, Megan Collins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To assess the patterns and predictors of glasses wear in a 2-year school-based study. Methods: Second and third graders underwent an eye examination at school. Two pairs of glasses were provided if they met prescribing criteria. Replacements were provided as needed. Students received follow-up examinations and completed survey questionnaires during the same and the following academic year. Results: Of the 197 students prescribed glasses who completed year 1 follow-up, 172 (87%), were observed to still be wearing glasses. However, less than two-thirds of students reported wearing glasses as prescribed (eg full-time if prescribed full-time). Most students, 175 (89%), reported being happy with their glasses and 135 (69%) reported improvement in vision. Thirty-nine students (20%) reported being teased about their glasses. Replacement glasses were required by 136 students (66%). Refractive error was not associated with likelihood of requiring replacement. Being observed wearing glasses correlated with parent (OR = 4.2; 95% CI, 1.2-15.0) and teacher reminders (OR = 6.4; 95% CI, 1.5-28.4) in year 2. Conclusions: Most children continued to wear glasses during follow-up, yet not always as prescribed. A substantial proportion of students required replacements, underscoring the importance of school-based programs developing mechanisms to monitor eyeglasses usage and mechanisms to replace lost or broken pairs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of AAPOS
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Baltimore
Eye Diseases
Compliance
Glass
Reading
Students
Refractive Errors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Baltimore Reading and Eye Disease Study (BREDS) : compliance and satisfaction with glasses usage. / Huang, Amy H.; Guo, Xinxing; Mudie, Lucy I.; Wolf, Rebecca; Owoeye, Josephine; Repka, Michael X; Friedman, David S; Slavin, Robert E.; Collins, Megan.

In: Journal of AAPOS, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Huang, Amy H. ; Guo, Xinxing ; Mudie, Lucy I. ; Wolf, Rebecca ; Owoeye, Josephine ; Repka, Michael X ; Friedman, David S ; Slavin, Robert E. ; Collins, Megan. / Baltimore Reading and Eye Disease Study (BREDS) : compliance and satisfaction with glasses usage. In: Journal of AAPOS. 2019.
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