Back injury in municipal workers: A case-control study

Ann H. Myers, Susan P. Baker, Guohua Li, Gordon S. Smith, Steven Wiker, Kung Yee Liang, Jeffrey V. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with acute low back injury among municipal employees of a large city. Methods. For each of 200 injured case patients, 2 coworker controls were randomly selected, the first matched on gender, job, and department and the second matched on gender and job classification. In-person interviews were conducted to collect data on demographics, work history, work characteristics, work injuries, back pain, psychosocial and work organization, health behaviors, and anthropometric and ergonomic factors related to the job. Psychosocial work organization variables were examined with factor analysis techniques; an aggregate value for job strain was entered into the final model. Risk factors were examined via multivariate logistic regression techniques. Results. High job strain was the most important factor affecting back injury (odds ratio [OR] = 2.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.28, 3.52), and it showed a significant dose- response effect. Body mass index (OR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.08, 2.18) and a work movement index (twisting, extended reaching, and stooping) (OR and equals; 1.42, 95% CI = 2.08) were also significant factors. Conclusions. Results suggest that increasing workers' control over their jobs reduces levels of job strain Ergonomic strategies and worksite health promotion may help reduce other risk factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1036-1041
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume89
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Back Injuries
Case-Control Studies
Human Engineering
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Health Behavior
Back Pain
Health Promotion
Workplace
Statistical Factor Analysis
Body Mass Index
Logistic Models
Demography
Interviews
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Myers, A. H., Baker, S. P., Li, G., Smith, G. S., Wiker, S., Liang, K. Y., & Johnson, J. V. (1999). Back injury in municipal workers: A case-control study. American Journal of Public Health, 89(7), 1036-1041.

Back injury in municipal workers : A case-control study. / Myers, Ann H.; Baker, Susan P.; Li, Guohua; Smith, Gordon S.; Wiker, Steven; Liang, Kung Yee; Johnson, Jeffrey V.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 89, No. 7, 07.1999, p. 1036-1041.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Myers, AH, Baker, SP, Li, G, Smith, GS, Wiker, S, Liang, KY & Johnson, JV 1999, 'Back injury in municipal workers: A case-control study', American Journal of Public Health, vol. 89, no. 7, pp. 1036-1041.
Myers AH, Baker SP, Li G, Smith GS, Wiker S, Liang KY et al. Back injury in municipal workers: A case-control study. American Journal of Public Health. 1999 Jul;89(7):1036-1041.
Myers, Ann H. ; Baker, Susan P. ; Li, Guohua ; Smith, Gordon S. ; Wiker, Steven ; Liang, Kung Yee ; Johnson, Jeffrey V. / Back injury in municipal workers : A case-control study. In: American Journal of Public Health. 1999 ; Vol. 89, No. 7. pp. 1036-1041.
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