Axoplasmic transport in papilledema and glaucoma

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Cytoplasmic constituents of neurons undergo constant directional flow. This phenomenon is noted universally in all neurons in the body and is called axoplasmic transport. This subject has been extensively discussed in the cell biology literature and, more recently, in the ophthalmic literature. On the basis of direction and rate of flow, axoplasmic transport is described to consist of at least three components: an orthograde rapid component, an orthograde slow component, and a retrograde component.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTransactions of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology
Volume83
Edition5
StatePublished - 1977
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Papilledema
Axonal Transport
Glaucoma
Neurons
Cell Biology
Direction compound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Tso, M. O. M. (1977). Axoplasmic transport in papilledema and glaucoma. In Transactions of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology (5 ed., Vol. 83)

Axoplasmic transport in papilledema and glaucoma. / Tso, M. O M.

Transactions of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology. Vol. 83 5. ed. 1977.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Tso, MOM 1977, Axoplasmic transport in papilledema and glaucoma. in Transactions of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology. 5 edn, vol. 83.
Tso MOM. Axoplasmic transport in papilledema and glaucoma. In Transactions of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology. 5 ed. Vol. 83. 1977
Tso, M. O M. / Axoplasmic transport in papilledema and glaucoma. Transactions of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology. Vol. 83 5. ed. 1977.
@inbook{f432cd99da7440e587f367abfe7e3c65,
title = "Axoplasmic transport in papilledema and glaucoma",
abstract = "Cytoplasmic constituents of neurons undergo constant directional flow. This phenomenon is noted universally in all neurons in the body and is called axoplasmic transport. This subject has been extensively discussed in the cell biology literature and, more recently, in the ophthalmic literature. On the basis of direction and rate of flow, axoplasmic transport is described to consist of at least three components: an orthograde rapid component, an orthograde slow component, and a retrograde component.",
author = "Tso, {M. O M}",
year = "1977",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "83",
booktitle = "Transactions of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology",
edition = "5",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Axoplasmic transport in papilledema and glaucoma

AU - Tso, M. O M

PY - 1977

Y1 - 1977

N2 - Cytoplasmic constituents of neurons undergo constant directional flow. This phenomenon is noted universally in all neurons in the body and is called axoplasmic transport. This subject has been extensively discussed in the cell biology literature and, more recently, in the ophthalmic literature. On the basis of direction and rate of flow, axoplasmic transport is described to consist of at least three components: an orthograde rapid component, an orthograde slow component, and a retrograde component.

AB - Cytoplasmic constituents of neurons undergo constant directional flow. This phenomenon is noted universally in all neurons in the body and is called axoplasmic transport. This subject has been extensively discussed in the cell biology literature and, more recently, in the ophthalmic literature. On the basis of direction and rate of flow, axoplasmic transport is described to consist of at least three components: an orthograde rapid component, an orthograde slow component, and a retrograde component.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0347707300&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0347707300&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Chapter

C2 - 73252

AN - SCOPUS:0347707300

VL - 83

BT - Transactions of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology

ER -