Awareness, Care and Treatment In Obesity maNagement to inform Haemophilia Obesity Patient Empowerment (ACTION-TO-HOPE): Results of a survey of US haemophilia treatment centre professionals

Michael Wang, Skye Peltier, Kimberly Baumann, Robert F. Sidonio, Michelle Witkop, David L. Cooper, Emily K. Waters, Scott Kahan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Despite the high prevalence of overweight and obesity in the United States, few studies have assessed the impact of obesity on haemophilia-specific outcomes or experiences/perceptions of healthcare providers (HCPs) treating haemophilia. Aim: The Awareness, Care and Treatment In Obesity maNagement to inform Haemophilia Obesity Patient Empowerment (ACTION-TO-HOPE) study was designed to identify HCP insights on the unique challenges of patients with haemophilia and obesity/overweight (PwHO) and the barriers to chronic weight management. Methods: An online survey collected data from haemophilia treatment centre-based HCPs. Respondents included 10 adults and 29 paediatric haematologists, 27 nurses/nurse practitioners/physician assistants, 22 physical therapists and 17 social workers. Results: Almost all HCPs rated obesity of moderate/high concern and reported that weight significantly affects future health and has an impact on life expectancy, yet fewer than 60% reported discussing the impact of weight on health with their patients. HCPs reported that few PwHO tried to lose weight; not many were ‘successful’. HCPs perceived a desire to feel better physically and joint pain as top motivating factors. HCPs believe that PwHO would have less joint bleeding and pain and greater mobility if they lost weight. HCPs viewed lack of exercise and food preferences/habits as the biggest barriers to initiating/maintaining weight loss and therefore recommended increasing exercise and healthier eating to their patients. However, physical activity in this patient population is limited and requires advice and support. Conclusions: Most HCPs appreciated the impact of obesity on joint bleeding, pain, and function and quality of life. Reduced food intake and increased activity are the most commonly recommended weight-loss strategies but the least likely to be successful. HCPs desire additional education/materials to understand weight management for PwHO.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)20-30
Number of pages11
JournalHaemophilia
Volume26
Issue numberS1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2020

Keywords

  • body mass index
  • haemophilia
  • healthcare provider
  • obesity
  • overweight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Genetics(clinical)

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