Aversion to injection limits acceptability of extended-release naltrexone among homeless, alcohol-dependent patients

Peter D. Friedmann, Dawn Mello, Sean Lonergan, Claire Bourgault, Thomas P. Otoole

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Ending homelessness is a major priority of the Department of Veteran Affairs (VA), and alcohol use can be a barrier to stable housing. Clinical trials suggest that depot extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX) is efficacious in reducing alcohol consumption among alcohol-dependent subjects. Methods: An open-label, randomized pilot study sought to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of XR-NTX versus oral naltrexone to improve alcohol consumption and housing stability among homeless, alcohol-dependent veterans at the Providence Veteran Affairs Medical Center. Results: Of 215 potential candidates approached over a 16-month recruitment period, only 15 agreed to consider study entry and 7 were randomized. The primary reasons given for refusal were not wanting an injection; fear of needles; and not wanting to change drinking habits. Only 1 participant in the XR-NTX group returned after the first injection. Three participants in the oral naltrexone group attended all 7 visits and had good outcomes. Conclusions: Although XR-NTX has demonstrated efficacy in reducing heavy drinking, limited acceptance of the injection might reduce its effectiveness among homeless, alcohol-dependent patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)94-96
Number of pages3
JournalSubstance Abuse
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Naltrexone
Veterans
Alcohols
Injections
Alcohol Drinking
Drinking
Homeless Persons
Habits
Fear
Needles
Clinical Trials

Keywords

  • alcohol dependence
  • Homelessness
  • naltrexone
  • substance abuse
  • veterans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Aversion to injection limits acceptability of extended-release naltrexone among homeless, alcohol-dependent patients. / Friedmann, Peter D.; Mello, Dawn; Lonergan, Sean; Bourgault, Claire; Otoole, Thomas P.

In: Substance Abuse, Vol. 34, No. 2, 01.04.2013, p. 94-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Friedmann, Peter D. ; Mello, Dawn ; Lonergan, Sean ; Bourgault, Claire ; Otoole, Thomas P. / Aversion to injection limits acceptability of extended-release naltrexone among homeless, alcohol-dependent patients. In: Substance Abuse. 2013 ; Vol. 34, No. 2. pp. 94-96.
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