Autonomy as a prospective predictor of perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness through symptoms of depression

Victoria O'Keefe, Demond M. Grant, Raymond P. Tucker, William V. Lechner, Adam C. Mills, Matt R. Judah, Laricka R. Wingate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between sociotropy, autonomy, depression symptoms, perceived burdensomeness, and thwarted belongingness in a sample of 113 undergraduate students. A prospective design with three time points was utilized to determine whether personality styles and depression symptoms play a role in the development of perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness, two interpersonal suicide risk factors. Time 1 autonomy predicted depression symptoms at Time 2; Time 2 depression symptoms predicted thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness at Time 3. Results suggest depression symptoms mediate the relationship between autonomy and thwarted belongingness, and autonomy and perceived burdensomeness. This study contributes to understanding how the presence of specific personality traits may lead to depression symptoms, which in turn leads to perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness. Clinical implications, including assessment of autonomy, and perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness, are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)70-86
Number of pages17
JournalOmega (United States)
Volume73
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Autonomy
  • Depression
  • Interpersonal
  • Sociotropy
  • Suicide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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