Autobiographical memory and suggestibility in children with autism spectrum disorder

Maggie Bruck, Kamala London, Rebecca Landa, June Godman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Two paradigms were developed to examine autobiographical memory (ABM) and suggestibility in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Children with ASD (N = 30) and typically developing chronological age-matched children (N = 38) ranging in age from 5 to 10 years were administered an ABM questionnaire. Children were asked about details of current and past personally experienced events. Children also participated in a staged event, and later were provided with true and false reminders about that event. Later, children again were interviewed about the staged event. The results from both paradigms revealed that children with ASD showed poorer ABM compared to controls. Generally, their ABM was marked by errors of omission rather than by errors of commission, and memory was particularly poor for early-life events. In addition, they were as suggestible as the typically developing children. The results are discussed in terms of applied and theoretical implications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-95
Number of pages23
JournalDevelopment and psychopathology
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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