Augmentation of behavior therapy with D-cycloserine for obsessive-compulsive disorder

Sabine Wilhelm, Ulrike Buhlmann, David F. Tolin, Suzanne A. Meunier, Godfrey D. Pearlson, Hannah E. Reese, Paul Cannistraro, Michael A. Jenike, Scott L. Rauch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: This study examined whether D-cycloserine, a partial agonist at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamatergic receptor, enhances the efficacy of behavior therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial investigating D-cycloserine versus placebo augmentation of behavior therapy was conducted in 23 OCD patients. Patients first underwent a diagnostic interview and pretreatment evaluation, followed by a psychoeducational/treatment planning session. Then they received 10 behavior therapy sessions. Treatment sessions were conducted twice per week. One hour before each of the behavior therapy sessions, the participants received either D-cycloserine, 100 mg, or a placebo. Results: Relative to the placebo group, the D-cycloserine group's OCD symptoms were significantly more improved at mid-treatment, and the D-cycloserine group's depressive symptoms were significantly more improved at posttreatment. Conclusions: These data provide support for the use of D-cycloserine as an augmentation of behavior therapy for OCD and extend findings in animals and other human disorders suggesting that behavior therapy acts by way of long-term potentiation of glutamatergic pathways and that the effects of behavior therapy are potentiated by an NMDA agonist.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-341
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume165
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cycloserine
Behavior Therapy
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Placebos
Long-Term Potentiation
N-Methylaspartate
N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors
Therapeutics
Interviews
Depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Wilhelm, S., Buhlmann, U., Tolin, D. F., Meunier, S. A., Pearlson, G. D., Reese, H. E., ... Rauch, S. L. (2008). Augmentation of behavior therapy with D-cycloserine for obsessive-compulsive disorder. American Journal of Psychiatry, 165(3), 335-341. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2007.07050776

Augmentation of behavior therapy with D-cycloserine for obsessive-compulsive disorder. / Wilhelm, Sabine; Buhlmann, Ulrike; Tolin, David F.; Meunier, Suzanne A.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Reese, Hannah E.; Cannistraro, Paul; Jenike, Michael A.; Rauch, Scott L.

In: American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 165, No. 3, 03.2008, p. 335-341.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wilhelm, S, Buhlmann, U, Tolin, DF, Meunier, SA, Pearlson, GD, Reese, HE, Cannistraro, P, Jenike, MA & Rauch, SL 2008, 'Augmentation of behavior therapy with D-cycloserine for obsessive-compulsive disorder', American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 165, no. 3, pp. 335-341. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2007.07050776
Wilhelm, Sabine ; Buhlmann, Ulrike ; Tolin, David F. ; Meunier, Suzanne A. ; Pearlson, Godfrey D. ; Reese, Hannah E. ; Cannistraro, Paul ; Jenike, Michael A. ; Rauch, Scott L. / Augmentation of behavior therapy with D-cycloserine for obsessive-compulsive disorder. In: American Journal of Psychiatry. 2008 ; Vol. 165, No. 3. pp. 335-341.
@article{37f648b340ba4ef0a533d018539c8d23,
title = "Augmentation of behavior therapy with D-cycloserine for obsessive-compulsive disorder",
abstract = "Objective: This study examined whether D-cycloserine, a partial agonist at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamatergic receptor, enhances the efficacy of behavior therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial investigating D-cycloserine versus placebo augmentation of behavior therapy was conducted in 23 OCD patients. Patients first underwent a diagnostic interview and pretreatment evaluation, followed by a psychoeducational/treatment planning session. Then they received 10 behavior therapy sessions. Treatment sessions were conducted twice per week. One hour before each of the behavior therapy sessions, the participants received either D-cycloserine, 100 mg, or a placebo. Results: Relative to the placebo group, the D-cycloserine group's OCD symptoms were significantly more improved at mid-treatment, and the D-cycloserine group's depressive symptoms were significantly more improved at posttreatment. Conclusions: These data provide support for the use of D-cycloserine as an augmentation of behavior therapy for OCD and extend findings in animals and other human disorders suggesting that behavior therapy acts by way of long-term potentiation of glutamatergic pathways and that the effects of behavior therapy are potentiated by an NMDA agonist.",
author = "Sabine Wilhelm and Ulrike Buhlmann and Tolin, {David F.} and Meunier, {Suzanne A.} and Pearlson, {Godfrey D.} and Reese, {Hannah E.} and Paul Cannistraro and Jenike, {Michael A.} and Rauch, {Scott L.}",
year = "2008",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1176/appi.ajp.2007.07050776",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "165",
pages = "335--341",
journal = "American Journal of Psychiatry",
issn = "0002-953X",
publisher = "American Psychiatric Association",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Augmentation of behavior therapy with D-cycloserine for obsessive-compulsive disorder

AU - Wilhelm, Sabine

AU - Buhlmann, Ulrike

AU - Tolin, David F.

AU - Meunier, Suzanne A.

AU - Pearlson, Godfrey D.

AU - Reese, Hannah E.

AU - Cannistraro, Paul

AU - Jenike, Michael A.

AU - Rauch, Scott L.

PY - 2008/3

Y1 - 2008/3

N2 - Objective: This study examined whether D-cycloserine, a partial agonist at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamatergic receptor, enhances the efficacy of behavior therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial investigating D-cycloserine versus placebo augmentation of behavior therapy was conducted in 23 OCD patients. Patients first underwent a diagnostic interview and pretreatment evaluation, followed by a psychoeducational/treatment planning session. Then they received 10 behavior therapy sessions. Treatment sessions were conducted twice per week. One hour before each of the behavior therapy sessions, the participants received either D-cycloserine, 100 mg, or a placebo. Results: Relative to the placebo group, the D-cycloserine group's OCD symptoms were significantly more improved at mid-treatment, and the D-cycloserine group's depressive symptoms were significantly more improved at posttreatment. Conclusions: These data provide support for the use of D-cycloserine as an augmentation of behavior therapy for OCD and extend findings in animals and other human disorders suggesting that behavior therapy acts by way of long-term potentiation of glutamatergic pathways and that the effects of behavior therapy are potentiated by an NMDA agonist.

AB - Objective: This study examined whether D-cycloserine, a partial agonist at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamatergic receptor, enhances the efficacy of behavior therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial investigating D-cycloserine versus placebo augmentation of behavior therapy was conducted in 23 OCD patients. Patients first underwent a diagnostic interview and pretreatment evaluation, followed by a psychoeducational/treatment planning session. Then they received 10 behavior therapy sessions. Treatment sessions were conducted twice per week. One hour before each of the behavior therapy sessions, the participants received either D-cycloserine, 100 mg, or a placebo. Results: Relative to the placebo group, the D-cycloserine group's OCD symptoms were significantly more improved at mid-treatment, and the D-cycloserine group's depressive symptoms were significantly more improved at posttreatment. Conclusions: These data provide support for the use of D-cycloserine as an augmentation of behavior therapy for OCD and extend findings in animals and other human disorders suggesting that behavior therapy acts by way of long-term potentiation of glutamatergic pathways and that the effects of behavior therapy are potentiated by an NMDA agonist.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=42449140233&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=42449140233&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1176/appi.ajp.2007.07050776

DO - 10.1176/appi.ajp.2007.07050776

M3 - Article

C2 - 18245177

AN - SCOPUS:42449140233

VL - 165

SP - 335

EP - 341

JO - American Journal of Psychiatry

JF - American Journal of Psychiatry

SN - 0002-953X

IS - 3

ER -