Atypical Hidradenoma Mimicking Primary Mammary Carcinoma on Breast Fine-Needle Aspiration: A Case Report with Long-Term Follow-Up

Lisa Rooper, Jeffrey S. Iding, Jonathan D. Cuda, Syed Z Ali

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is well-established as an accurate technique for the diagnosis of palpable breast masses. While the differential diagnosis of such lesions usually focuses on benign or malignant mammary proliferations, a subset of breast neoplasms arises from skin and soft tissue. Skin adnexal neoplasms such as hidradenoma can pose a particular pitfall on breast FNA cytology (FNAC) as epithelial proliferations that are not of ductal or lobular origin. Case: A 59-year-old female presented with a superficial breast mass. FNAC revealed a hypercellular lesion with marked nuclear atypia that was highly suspicious for carcinoma. However, at partial mastectomy, the histological features of the tumor were consistent with atypical hidradenoma. Negativity for estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) confirmed the diagnosis. Eighteen years later, the patient remains free of recurrence or metastasis. Conclusions: This report offers the first description of findings of atypical hidradenoma on FNAC. In the breast, its high cellularity and nuclear atypia can mimic a primary mammary carcinoma on FNAC. Although breast and skin adnexal tumors show a immunohistochemical overlap, negative ER and PR stains in a low-grade tumor can suggest a nonmammary lesion. Skin adnexal neoplasms should be considered in the differential diagnosis of superficial breast tumors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalActa Cytologica
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 25 2016

Keywords

  • Breast
  • Fine-needle aspiration cytology
  • Hidradenoma#

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Histology

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