Attitudes toward and sexual partnerships with drug dealers among young adult African American females in socially disorganized communities

Leah J. Floyd, Qiana Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Drug markets in disadvantaged African American neighborhoods have altered social and sexual norms as well as sexual networks, which impact an individual's risk of contracting a sexually transmitted infection. Presently, we describe the prevalence of sexual partnerships with males involved with illegal drugs among a sample of non-drug-dependent females. In 2010, 120 Black females aged 18 to 30 years completed a semistructured HIV-risk interview. Descriptive statistics revealed approximately 80% of females perceived neighborhood drug activity as a major problem, 58% had sex with a male drug dealer, 48% reported sex with a male incarcerated for selling drugs, and 56% believed drug dealers have the most sexual partners. Our results suggest sexual partnerships with males involved in the distribution of drugs are prevalent. These partnerships may play a substantial role in the spread of sexually transmitted infections among low-risk females, as drug dealers likely serve as a bridge between higher HIV-risk drug and prison populations and lower HIV-risk females. However, the significance of partnerships with males involved in drug dealing has received little attention in HIV and drug abuse literature. Presently, there is a need for more research focused on understanding the extent to which the drug epidemic affects the HIV risk of non-drug-dependent Black female residents of neighborhoods inundated with drugs. Special consideration should be given to the role of the neighborhood drug dealer in the spread of sexually transmitted infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)154-163
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Drug Issues
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2013

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Drug dealers
  • Drug markets
  • Females
  • HIV risk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Attitudes toward and sexual partnerships with drug dealers among young adult African American females in socially disorganized communities'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this