Attitudes about stimulant medication for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder among African American families in an inner city community

Susan DosReis, Arlene Butz, Paul H. Lipkin, Julia S. Anixt, Courtney L. Weiner, Robin Chernoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Limited information exists on views among African American families living in low-income, inner-city communities regarding the treatment of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Parents of children treated for ADHD in an urban primary care setting were recruited to complete a survey to assess attitudes toward stimulant medications. Although most (71%) were initially hesitant to use stimulants based on what they heard in the lay press, 63% would recommend stimulant medication to a relative/friend whose child had ADHD. Approximately 17% believed stimulants led to drug abuse, 21% preferred counseling over medication, 21% felt medications had bad side effects, and 23% believed that too many children were medicated for ADHD. Most (90%) felt the medication was safe if a physician recommended it. Views did not differ between participants whose child had or had not received counseling. Additional studies are needed to clarify whether such views impact treatment choices and health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)423-430
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Behavioral Health Services and Research
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2006

Keywords

  • ADHD
  • Low-income
  • Parental attitudes
  • Primary care
  • Stimulant medications

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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