Attitudes about racism, medical mistrust, and satisfaction with care among African American and white cardiac patients

Thomas A. LaVeist, Kim J. Nickerson, Janice Bowie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The authors examine determinants of satisfaction with medical care among 1,784 (781 African American and 1,003 white) cardiac patients. Patient satisfaction was modeled as a function of predisposing factors (gender, age, medical mistrust, and perception of racism) and enabling factors (medical insurance). African Americans reported less satisfaction with care. Although both black and white patients tended not to endorse the existence of racism in the medical care system, African American patients were more likely to perceive racism. African American patients were significantly more likely to report mistrust. Multivariate analysis found that the perception of racism and mistrust of the medical care system led to less satisfaction with care. When perceived racism and medical mistrust were controlled, race was no longer a significant predictor of satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)146-161
Number of pages16
JournalMedical Care Research and Review
Volume57
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
StatePublished - 2000

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Racism
African Americans
racism
medical care
Causality
medical factors
Insurance
Patient Satisfaction
multivariate analysis
insurance
Multivariate Analysis
American
determinants
gender

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Attitudes about racism, medical mistrust, and satisfaction with care among African American and white cardiac patients. / LaVeist, Thomas A.; Nickerson, Kim J.; Bowie, Janice.

In: Medical Care Research and Review, Vol. 57, No. SUPPL. 1, 2000, p. 146-161.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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