Attenuation of baroreflexes during operant cardiac conditioning

B. T. Engel, J. A. Joseph

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Three monkeys were trained to slow and to speed heart rate on an operant schedule. After the animals were performing highly reliably they received injections of nitroglycerin or phenylephrine to elicit baroreflexes during control periods and during slowing or speeding sessions. The findings were that each animal reliably attenuated its baroreflex sensitivity and thereby avoided shock. Thus, the data showed that under appropriate behavioral conditions homeostatic adjustments of the cardiovascular system are reduced.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)609-614
Number of pages6
JournalPsychophysiology
Volume19
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1982

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Operant Conditioning
Baroreflex
Social Adjustment
Nitroglycerin
Phenylephrine
Cardiovascular System
Haplorhini
Shock
Appointments and Schedules
Heart Rate
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Psychology(all)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Engel, B. T., & Joseph, J. A. (1982). Attenuation of baroreflexes during operant cardiac conditioning. Psychophysiology, 19(6), 609-614.

Attenuation of baroreflexes during operant cardiac conditioning. / Engel, B. T.; Joseph, J. A.

In: Psychophysiology, Vol. 19, No. 6, 1982, p. 609-614.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Engel, BT & Joseph, JA 1982, 'Attenuation of baroreflexes during operant cardiac conditioning', Psychophysiology, vol. 19, no. 6, pp. 609-614.
Engel, B. T. ; Joseph, J. A. / Attenuation of baroreflexes during operant cardiac conditioning. In: Psychophysiology. 1982 ; Vol. 19, No. 6. pp. 609-614.
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