Attention to painful cutaneous laser stimuli evokes directed functional interactions between human sensory and modulatory pain-related cortical areas

Chang Chia Liu, Shinji Ohara, Piotr J. Franaszczuk, Nathan E Crone, Frederick Lenz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The human 'pain network' includes cortical areas that are activated during the response to painful stimuli (termed category 1) or during psychological processes that modulate pain, for example, distraction (termed category 2). These categories include parts of the parasylvian (PS), medial frontal (MF), and paracentral cortex (S1&M1). Here we test the hypothesis that causal interactions both within and between category 1 and category 2 modules occur during attention to a painful stimulus. Event-related causality (ERC) was calculated from local field potentials recorded directly from these cortical areas during the response to a painful cutaneous laser stimulus in patients being monitored for epilepsy. The number of electrodes involved in pairs with significant ERC in category 1 was greater for pre-stimulus vs post-stimulus and for attention vs distraction. This is consistent with our prior evidence that the category 1 'pain network' changes rapidly with time intervals and tasks. In contrast, the interaction between categories was often unchanged or stable across intervals and tasks, particularly in MF. The proportion of contacts involved in interactions with PS was greater during distraction vs attention while activation was less, which suggests that distraction involves an inhibitory process in PS. Functional interactions between categories were overwhelmingly in the direction from category 2 > 1, particularly for contacts in MF which often had a driver role. These results demonstrate that MF is densely interconnected throughout the 'pain network' so that stimulation of MF might be used to disrupt the 'pain network' as a therapy for pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2781-2791
Number of pages11
JournalPain
Volume152
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011

Fingerprint

Lasers
Pain
Skin
Causality
Frontal Lobe
Epilepsy
Electrodes
Psychology
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Causality
  • Cortex
  • Event-related
  • Human
  • Network
  • Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Neurology
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Attention to painful cutaneous laser stimuli evokes directed functional interactions between human sensory and modulatory pain-related cortical areas. / Liu, Chang Chia; Ohara, Shinji; Franaszczuk, Piotr J.; Crone, Nathan E; Lenz, Frederick.

In: Pain, Vol. 152, No. 12, 12.2011, p. 2781-2791.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{97626a1dff8940928cab1593893a75a6,
title = "Attention to painful cutaneous laser stimuli evokes directed functional interactions between human sensory and modulatory pain-related cortical areas",
abstract = "The human 'pain network' includes cortical areas that are activated during the response to painful stimuli (termed category 1) or during psychological processes that modulate pain, for example, distraction (termed category 2). These categories include parts of the parasylvian (PS), medial frontal (MF), and paracentral cortex (S1&M1). Here we test the hypothesis that causal interactions both within and between category 1 and category 2 modules occur during attention to a painful stimulus. Event-related causality (ERC) was calculated from local field potentials recorded directly from these cortical areas during the response to a painful cutaneous laser stimulus in patients being monitored for epilepsy. The number of electrodes involved in pairs with significant ERC in category 1 was greater for pre-stimulus vs post-stimulus and for attention vs distraction. This is consistent with our prior evidence that the category 1 'pain network' changes rapidly with time intervals and tasks. In contrast, the interaction between categories was often unchanged or stable across intervals and tasks, particularly in MF. The proportion of contacts involved in interactions with PS was greater during distraction vs attention while activation was less, which suggests that distraction involves an inhibitory process in PS. Functional interactions between categories were overwhelmingly in the direction from category 2 > 1, particularly for contacts in MF which often had a driver role. These results demonstrate that MF is densely interconnected throughout the 'pain network' so that stimulation of MF might be used to disrupt the 'pain network' as a therapy for pain.",
keywords = "Attention, Causality, Cortex, Event-related, Human, Network, Pain",
author = "Liu, {Chang Chia} and Shinji Ohara and Franaszczuk, {Piotr J.} and Crone, {Nathan E} and Frederick Lenz",
year = "2011",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1016/j.pain.2011.09.002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "152",
pages = "2781--2791",
journal = "Pain",
issn = "0304-3959",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Attention to painful cutaneous laser stimuli evokes directed functional interactions between human sensory and modulatory pain-related cortical areas

AU - Liu, Chang Chia

AU - Ohara, Shinji

AU - Franaszczuk, Piotr J.

AU - Crone, Nathan E

AU - Lenz, Frederick

PY - 2011/12

Y1 - 2011/12

N2 - The human 'pain network' includes cortical areas that are activated during the response to painful stimuli (termed category 1) or during psychological processes that modulate pain, for example, distraction (termed category 2). These categories include parts of the parasylvian (PS), medial frontal (MF), and paracentral cortex (S1&M1). Here we test the hypothesis that causal interactions both within and between category 1 and category 2 modules occur during attention to a painful stimulus. Event-related causality (ERC) was calculated from local field potentials recorded directly from these cortical areas during the response to a painful cutaneous laser stimulus in patients being monitored for epilepsy. The number of electrodes involved in pairs with significant ERC in category 1 was greater for pre-stimulus vs post-stimulus and for attention vs distraction. This is consistent with our prior evidence that the category 1 'pain network' changes rapidly with time intervals and tasks. In contrast, the interaction between categories was often unchanged or stable across intervals and tasks, particularly in MF. The proportion of contacts involved in interactions with PS was greater during distraction vs attention while activation was less, which suggests that distraction involves an inhibitory process in PS. Functional interactions between categories were overwhelmingly in the direction from category 2 > 1, particularly for contacts in MF which often had a driver role. These results demonstrate that MF is densely interconnected throughout the 'pain network' so that stimulation of MF might be used to disrupt the 'pain network' as a therapy for pain.

AB - The human 'pain network' includes cortical areas that are activated during the response to painful stimuli (termed category 1) or during psychological processes that modulate pain, for example, distraction (termed category 2). These categories include parts of the parasylvian (PS), medial frontal (MF), and paracentral cortex (S1&M1). Here we test the hypothesis that causal interactions both within and between category 1 and category 2 modules occur during attention to a painful stimulus. Event-related causality (ERC) was calculated from local field potentials recorded directly from these cortical areas during the response to a painful cutaneous laser stimulus in patients being monitored for epilepsy. The number of electrodes involved in pairs with significant ERC in category 1 was greater for pre-stimulus vs post-stimulus and for attention vs distraction. This is consistent with our prior evidence that the category 1 'pain network' changes rapidly with time intervals and tasks. In contrast, the interaction between categories was often unchanged or stable across intervals and tasks, particularly in MF. The proportion of contacts involved in interactions with PS was greater during distraction vs attention while activation was less, which suggests that distraction involves an inhibitory process in PS. Functional interactions between categories were overwhelmingly in the direction from category 2 > 1, particularly for contacts in MF which often had a driver role. These results demonstrate that MF is densely interconnected throughout the 'pain network' so that stimulation of MF might be used to disrupt the 'pain network' as a therapy for pain.

KW - Attention

KW - Causality

KW - Cortex

KW - Event-related

KW - Human

KW - Network

KW - Pain

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=81055157590&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=81055157590&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.pain.2011.09.002

DO - 10.1016/j.pain.2011.09.002

M3 - Article

C2 - 22033363

AN - SCOPUS:81055157590

VL - 152

SP - 2781

EP - 2791

JO - Pain

JF - Pain

SN - 0304-3959

IS - 12

ER -