Attention modulates responses in the human lateral geniculate nucleus

Daniel H O'Connor, Miki M. Fukui, Mark A. Pinsk, Sabine Kastner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Attentional mechanisms are important for selecting relevant information and filtering out irrelevant information from cluttered visual scenes. Selective attention has previously been shown to affect neural activity in both extrastriate and striate visual cortex. Here, evidence from functional brain imaging shows that attentional response modulation is not confined to cortical processing, but can occur as early as the thalamic level. We found that attention modulated neural activity in the human lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) in several ways: it enhanced neural responses to attended stimuli, attenuated responses to ignored stimuli and increased baseline activity in the absence of visual stimulation. The LGN, traditionally viewed as the gateway to visual cortex, may also serve as a 'gatekeeper' in controlling attentional response gain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1203-1209
Number of pages7
JournalNature Neuroscience
Volume5
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Geniculate Bodies
Visual Cortex
Photic Stimulation
Functional Neuroimaging
Human Activities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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Attention modulates responses in the human lateral geniculate nucleus. / O'Connor, Daniel H; Fukui, Miki M.; Pinsk, Mark A.; Kastner, Sabine.

In: Nature Neuroscience, Vol. 5, No. 11, 01.11.2002, p. 1203-1209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

O'Connor, Daniel H ; Fukui, Miki M. ; Pinsk, Mark A. ; Kastner, Sabine. / Attention modulates responses in the human lateral geniculate nucleus. In: Nature Neuroscience. 2002 ; Vol. 5, No. 11. pp. 1203-1209.
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