Atherosclerosis monitoring in the elderly using magnetic resonance imaging: Is the extra step needed?

Ilan Gottlieb, Sérgio Salles Xavier, Joao Lima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Atherosclerotic disease represents an enormous burden in the elderly population, yet elderly patients are underrepresented in clinical trials and receive lower standard-of-care treatment compared with similar-risk younger individuals. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful noninvasive imaging technique that can target atherosclerotic lesions and help better understand the pathophysiologic process of this disease in the elderly. Cholesterol-targeted interventions have improved the outcomes in patients with atherosclerotic disease, but clearly additional efforts are needed. Whether medical therapy can be effectively adjusted based on atherosclerosis progression revealed by MRI is still to be proven, but the technique certainly looks promising.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)363-368
Number of pages6
JournalThe American journal of geriatric cardiology
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007

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Atherosclerosis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Standard of Care
Cholesterol
Clinical Trials
Therapeutics
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Health Policy
  • Gerontology

Cite this

Atherosclerosis monitoring in the elderly using magnetic resonance imaging : Is the extra step needed? / Gottlieb, Ilan; Xavier, Sérgio Salles; Lima, Joao.

In: The American journal of geriatric cardiology, Vol. 16, No. 6, 11.2007, p. 363-368.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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