Asynchrony between human cumulus-corona cell complex and oocyte maturation after human menopausal gonadotropin treatment for in vitro fertilization

N. Laufer, B. C. Tarlatzis, A. H. DeCherney, J. T. Masters, F. P. Haseltine, N. MacLusky, F. Naftolin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

One hundred seventeen oocyte-cumulus-corona cell complexes (CCCs) were obtained from 15 women undergoing in vitro fertilization after human menopausal gonadotropin/human chorionic gonadotropin follicular stimulation. In each woman, five oocyte-CCCs were left intact, and the remaining one to five oocytes were freed of their CCCs by hyaluronidase (300 IU/ml) dispersal treatment. Dispersal time for individual CCCs correlated well with their degree of mucification and was significantly shorter in 20 mature CCCs as compared with 24 intermediate CCCs (1.20 ± 0.05 versus 2.35 ± 0.13 minutes, respectively; P<0.001). Oocyte maturation at collection and after 8 hours of in vitro incubation was not related to the CCC type present at harvest. Maturation of oocytes progressed regard less of CCC type; so that after 8 hours of preincubation, 73% of the oocytes attained a polar body while 20% were still at the germinal vesicle breakdown stage and 7% at the germinal vesicle stage. Overall, the 44 denuded oocytes and 72 intact oocyte-CCCs were comparable in rate of fertilization (64% versus 68%) and subsequent cleavage (75% versus 82% of all fertilized oocytes). It is concluded that in human menopausal gonadotropin-stimulated cycles, asynchrony between individual CCC mucification and oocyte maturation may occur, and that the absence of CCC does not seem to affect in vitro fertilization and cleavage rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)366-372
Number of pages7
JournalFertility and sterility
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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