Asynchronous administration of xenon and hypothermia significantly reduces brain infarction in the neonatal rat

J. L. Martin, D. Ma, M. Hossain, J. Xu, R. D. Sanders, N. P. Franks, M. Maze

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. Neonatal asphyxia causes long-term neurological and behavioural impairment in the developing brain. Concurrent administration of xenon and hypothermia synergistically reduces long-term damage in a rat model of neonatal asphyxia. This study sought to investigate whether asynchronous administration of xenon and hypothermia is capable of combining synergistically to provide neuroprotection. Methods. Seven-day-old rats were subjected to right common carotid artery occlusion followed by 90 min hypoxia with 8% oxygen. After a 1 h recovery period, rats received asynchronous administration of mild hypothermia (35°C) and xenon (20%) with a 1 or 5 h gap between interventions, xenon (20%) alone, or mild hypothermia (35°C) alone. Infarct volume in the brain was measured 4 days after injury. Results. Administration of hypothermia or xenon alone, 1 and 6 h after the hypoxic ischaemic insult, respectively, provided no neuroprotection. Asynchronous administration of xenon and hypothermia at a 1 h interval produced a significant reduction in infarct volume [93 (7) vs 74 (8); P <0.05]. Reduction in infarct volume was also present when hypothermia and xenon were asynchronously administered with an intervening gap of 5 h [97 (5) vs 83 (3); P <0.05]. Conclusions. This finding provides a rationale for investigating the combined use of hypothermia and xenon in a progressive manner for the management of neonatal asphyxia. Thus, hypothermia can be administrated at the site of delivery and xenon can be administered later.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)236-240
Number of pages5
JournalBritish Journal of Anaesthesia
Volume98
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Brain Infarction
Xenon
Hypothermia
Asphyxia
Common Carotid Artery
Brain
Oxygen

Keywords

  • Anaesthetics gases, xenon
  • Hypothermia, asynchronous
  • Hypoxia-ischaemia
  • Neonate
  • Rat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Asynchronous administration of xenon and hypothermia significantly reduces brain infarction in the neonatal rat. / Martin, J. L.; Ma, D.; Hossain, M.; Xu, J.; Sanders, R. D.; Franks, N. P.; Maze, M.

In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, Vol. 98, No. 2, 02.2007, p. 236-240.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Martin, J. L. ; Ma, D. ; Hossain, M. ; Xu, J. ; Sanders, R. D. ; Franks, N. P. ; Maze, M. / Asynchronous administration of xenon and hypothermia significantly reduces brain infarction in the neonatal rat. In: British Journal of Anaesthesia. 2007 ; Vol. 98, No. 2. pp. 236-240.
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abstract = "Background. Neonatal asphyxia causes long-term neurological and behavioural impairment in the developing brain. Concurrent administration of xenon and hypothermia synergistically reduces long-term damage in a rat model of neonatal asphyxia. This study sought to investigate whether asynchronous administration of xenon and hypothermia is capable of combining synergistically to provide neuroprotection. Methods. Seven-day-old rats were subjected to right common carotid artery occlusion followed by 90 min hypoxia with 8{\%} oxygen. After a 1 h recovery period, rats received asynchronous administration of mild hypothermia (35°C) and xenon (20{\%}) with a 1 or 5 h gap between interventions, xenon (20{\%}) alone, or mild hypothermia (35°C) alone. Infarct volume in the brain was measured 4 days after injury. Results. Administration of hypothermia or xenon alone, 1 and 6 h after the hypoxic ischaemic insult, respectively, provided no neuroprotection. Asynchronous administration of xenon and hypothermia at a 1 h interval produced a significant reduction in infarct volume [93 (7) vs 74 (8); P <0.05]. Reduction in infarct volume was also present when hypothermia and xenon were asynchronously administered with an intervening gap of 5 h [97 (5) vs 83 (3); P <0.05]. Conclusions. This finding provides a rationale for investigating the combined use of hypothermia and xenon in a progressive manner for the management of neonatal asphyxia. Thus, hypothermia can be administrated at the site of delivery and xenon can be administered later.",
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AB - Background. Neonatal asphyxia causes long-term neurological and behavioural impairment in the developing brain. Concurrent administration of xenon and hypothermia synergistically reduces long-term damage in a rat model of neonatal asphyxia. This study sought to investigate whether asynchronous administration of xenon and hypothermia is capable of combining synergistically to provide neuroprotection. Methods. Seven-day-old rats were subjected to right common carotid artery occlusion followed by 90 min hypoxia with 8% oxygen. After a 1 h recovery period, rats received asynchronous administration of mild hypothermia (35°C) and xenon (20%) with a 1 or 5 h gap between interventions, xenon (20%) alone, or mild hypothermia (35°C) alone. Infarct volume in the brain was measured 4 days after injury. Results. Administration of hypothermia or xenon alone, 1 and 6 h after the hypoxic ischaemic insult, respectively, provided no neuroprotection. Asynchronous administration of xenon and hypothermia at a 1 h interval produced a significant reduction in infarct volume [93 (7) vs 74 (8); P <0.05]. Reduction in infarct volume was also present when hypothermia and xenon were asynchronously administered with an intervening gap of 5 h [97 (5) vs 83 (3); P <0.05]. Conclusions. This finding provides a rationale for investigating the combined use of hypothermia and xenon in a progressive manner for the management of neonatal asphyxia. Thus, hypothermia can be administrated at the site of delivery and xenon can be administered later.

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