Asymptomatic HIV infection does not cause EEG abnormalities: Results from the multicenter AIDS cohort study (MACS)

M. R. Nuwer, E. N. Miller, B. R. Visscher, E. Niedermeyer, J. W. Packwood, L. Carlson, P. Satz, W. Jankel, J. C. Mc Arthur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We conducted EEG testing in 200 asymptomatic homosexual men, half of whom were HIV seropositive. We chose to include half of the subjects because they were rated as impaired on a neuropsychological screening test. We used both traditional visual EEG interpretation and quantitative EEG analysis. Abnormal EEGs and borderline degrees of EEG slowing occurred in 32% of these men. These EEG changes were not related to HIV serostatus. EEG changes did correlate with the impaired neuropsychological test performance. Clinicians faced with abnormal EEG results or borderline EEG slowing in an asymptomatic HIV-seropositive patient should not attribute the EEG change to effects of the serostatus itself but should look for other causes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1214-1219
Number of pages6
JournalNeurology
Volume42
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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    Nuwer, M. R., Miller, E. N., Visscher, B. R., Niedermeyer, E., Packwood, J. W., Carlson, L., Satz, P., Jankel, W., & Mc Arthur, J. C. (1992). Asymptomatic HIV infection does not cause EEG abnormalities: Results from the multicenter AIDS cohort study (MACS). Neurology, 42(6), 1214-1219. https://doi.org/10.1212/wnl.42.6.1214