Astrocytes play a key role in activation of microglia by persistent Borna disease virus infection

Mikhail V. Ovanesov, Yavuz Ayhan, Candie Wolbert, Krisztina Moldovan, Christian Sauder, Mikhail Pletnikov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Neonatal Borna disease virus (BDV) infection of the rat brain is associated with microglial activation and damage to certain neuronal populations. Since persistent BDV infection of neurons is nonlytic in vitro, activated microglia have been suggested to be responsible for neuronal cell death in vivo. However, the mechanisms of activation of microglia in neonatally BDV-infected rat brains remain unclear. Our previous studies have shown that activation of microglia by BDV in culture requires the presence of astrocytes as neither the virus nor BDV-infected neurons alone activate microglia. Here, we evaluated the mechanisms whereby astrocytes can contribute to activation of microglia in neuron-glia-microglia mixed cultures. We found that persistent infection of neuronal cells leads to activation of uninfected astrocytes as measured by elevated expression of RANTES. Activation of astrocytes then produces activation of microglia as evidenced by increased formation of round-shaped, MHCI-, MHCII- and IL-6-positive microglia cells. Our analysis of possible molecular mechanisms of activation of astrocytes and/or microglia in culture indicates that the mediators of activation may be soluble heat-resistant, low molecular weight factors. The findings indicate that astrocytes may mediate activation of microglia by BDV-infected neurons. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that microglia activation in the absence of neuronal damage may represent initial steps in the gradual neurodegeneration observed in brains of neonatally BDV-infected rats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number50
JournalJournal of Neuroinflammation
Volume5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 11 2008

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Borna disease virus
Microglia
Virus Diseases
Astrocytes
Neurons
Infant, Newborn, Diseases
Brain
Chemokine CCL5
Neuroglia
Interleukin-6

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Neurology
  • Immunology
  • Neuroscience(all)

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Astrocytes play a key role in activation of microglia by persistent Borna disease virus infection. / Ovanesov, Mikhail V.; Ayhan, Yavuz; Wolbert, Candie; Moldovan, Krisztina; Sauder, Christian; Pletnikov, Mikhail.

In: Journal of Neuroinflammation, Vol. 5, 50, 11.11.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ovanesov, Mikhail V. ; Ayhan, Yavuz ; Wolbert, Candie ; Moldovan, Krisztina ; Sauder, Christian ; Pletnikov, Mikhail. / Astrocytes play a key role in activation of microglia by persistent Borna disease virus infection. In: Journal of Neuroinflammation. 2008 ; Vol. 5.
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