Asthma, atopy, and lung function among racially diverse, poor inner-urban Minneapolis schoolchildren

Ian A. Greaves, Ken Sexton, Malcolm N. Blumenthal, Timothy R. Church, John L. Adgate, Gurumurthy Ramachandran, Ann L. Fredrickson, Andrew D. Ryan, Mindy S. Geisser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

As part of an assessment of schoolchildren's environmental exposures and health, a probability sample of 136 children from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds was drawn from grades 2-5 of two inner-urban Minneapolis schools (Whittier, Lyndale). Questionnaires were administered to a parent/guardian; blood samples for IgE and lung function tests were obtained. Overall adjusted rates for lifetime asthma (15.4%; 95%CI 9.3-21.5%), asthma in the last 12 months (13.6%; 7.8-19.4%), and current asthma medication use (10.5%; 5.3-15.7%) were higher than reported US national rates. Adjusted rates for lifetime physician-diagnosed asthma differed significantly among racial/ethnic groups (P<0.01): African-Americans (25.9%), White/Others (25.8%), Hispanics (9.3%), Somalis (1.8%), Asians (0%). Corresponding rates for atopy (total IgE>100 IU/mL or an allergen-specific IgE>0.35 IU/mL) were: African-Americans (66.6%), White/Others (100%), Hispanics (77.2%), Somalis (78.1%), Asians (81.8%). Lung function (FEV1, FVC) was analyzed by linear regression using log-transformed data: significant race-specific differences in lung function were found relative to White/Others (P<0.001 for each racial/ethnic group): African-Americans (FEV1 -16.5%, FVC -16.9%), Somalis (-22.7%, -26.8%), Hispanics (-12.2%, -11.4%) and Asians (-11.1%, -12.4%). Females had significantly lower FEV1 (-8.8%) and FVC (-11.0%) than males. An unexplained, significant difference in children's lung function was found between the two schools. A history of physician-diagnosed asthma was not associated with decreased lung function. Factors other than poverty, inner-urban living, and IgE levels (atopy) need to be considered in the development of childhood asthma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)257-266
Number of pages10
JournalEnvironmental Research
Volume103
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

asthma
Asthma
Lung
Immunoglobulin E
African American
ethnic group
Hispanic Americans
Ethnic Groups
African Americans
Physicians
Sampling Studies
Linear regression
Environmental Health
Allergens
Respiratory Function Tests
Environmental Exposure
Poverty
Blood
Health
Linear Models

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Atopy
  • Home and school environments
  • Lung function
  • Minority children

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Greaves, I. A., Sexton, K., Blumenthal, M. N., Church, T. R., Adgate, J. L., Ramachandran, G., ... Geisser, M. S. (2007). Asthma, atopy, and lung function among racially diverse, poor inner-urban Minneapolis schoolchildren. Environmental Research, 103(2), 257-266. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2006.09.002

Asthma, atopy, and lung function among racially diverse, poor inner-urban Minneapolis schoolchildren. / Greaves, Ian A.; Sexton, Ken; Blumenthal, Malcolm N.; Church, Timothy R.; Adgate, John L.; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Fredrickson, Ann L.; Ryan, Andrew D.; Geisser, Mindy S.

In: Environmental Research, Vol. 103, No. 2, 02.2007, p. 257-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Greaves, IA, Sexton, K, Blumenthal, MN, Church, TR, Adgate, JL, Ramachandran, G, Fredrickson, AL, Ryan, AD & Geisser, MS 2007, 'Asthma, atopy, and lung function among racially diverse, poor inner-urban Minneapolis schoolchildren', Environmental Research, vol. 103, no. 2, pp. 257-266. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2006.09.002
Greaves, Ian A. ; Sexton, Ken ; Blumenthal, Malcolm N. ; Church, Timothy R. ; Adgate, John L. ; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy ; Fredrickson, Ann L. ; Ryan, Andrew D. ; Geisser, Mindy S. / Asthma, atopy, and lung function among racially diverse, poor inner-urban Minneapolis schoolchildren. In: Environmental Research. 2007 ; Vol. 103, No. 2. pp. 257-266.
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