Associations between state intimate partner violence-related firearm policies and injuries among women and men who experience intimate partner violence

Tiara C. Willie, Trace Kershaw, Rachel Perler, Amy Caplon, Marina Katague, Tami P. Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Comprehensive state firearm policies related to intimate partner violence (IPV) may have a significant public health impact on non-lethal IPV-related injuries. Research indicates that more restrictive firearm policies may reduce risk for intimate partner homicide, however it is unclear whether firearm policies prevent or reduce the risk of non-lethal IPV-related injuries. This study sought to examine associations between state-level policies and injuries among U.S. IPV survivors. Methods: Individual-level data were drawn from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, a nationally-representative study of noninstitutionalized adults. State-level data were drawn from a firearm policy compendium. Multivariable regressions were used to test associations of individual policies with non-fatal IPV-related injuries (N = 5493). Regression models were also conducted to explore differences in the policy-injury associations among women and men survivors. Results: Three categories of policies were associated with IPV-related injuries. The odds of injuries was lower for IPV survivors living in states that prohibited firearm possession and require firearm relinquishment among persons convicted of IPV-related misdemeanors (aOR [95% CI] =.76 [.59,.97]); prohibited firearm possession and require firearm relinquishment among persons subject to IPV-related restraining orders (aOR [95% CI] =.81 [.66,.98]); and prohibited firearm possession among convicted of stalking (aOR [95% CI] =.82 [.68,.98]) than IPV survivors living in states without these policies. There was a significant difference between women and men survivors in the association between IPV-related misdemeanors policy and injuries (B [SE] =.60 [.29]), such that the association was stronger for men survivors (aOR [95% CI] =.10 [.06,.17]) than women survivors (aOR [95% CI] =.60 [.48,.76]). Conclusions: Restrictive state firearm policies regarding IPV may provide unique opportunities to protect IPV survivors from injuries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number8
JournalInjury Epidemiology
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Keywords

  • Firearms
  • Injuries
  • Intimate partner violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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