Associations between physical activity and cardiometabolic risk factors assessed in a Southern California health care system, 2010-2012

Deborah Rohm Young, Karen J. Coleman, Eunis Ngor, Kristi Reynolds, Margo Sidell, Robert E. Sallis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Risk factors associated with many chronic diseases can be improved through regular physical activity. This study investigated whether cross-sectional associations between physical activity, assessed by the Exercise Vital Sign (EVS), and cardiometabolic risk factors can be detected in clinical settings. Methods: We used electronic records from Kaiser Permanente Southern California members (N = 622,897) to examine the association of EVS category with blood pressure, fasting glucose, random glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin. Adults aged 18 years or older with at least 3 EVS measures between April 2010 and December 2012, without comorbid conditions, and not taking antihypertension or glucose-lowering medications were included. We compared consistently inactive (EVS = 0 min/wk for every measure) with consistently active (EVS ≥150 min/wk) and irregularly active (EVS 1-149 min/wk or not meeting the consistently active or inactive criteria) patients. Separate linear regression analyses were conducted controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, body mass index, and smoking status. Results: Consistently active women had lower systolic (-4.60 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval [CI], -4.70 to -4.44) and diastolic (-3.28 mm Hg; 95% CI, -3.40 to -3.17) blood pressure than inactive women. Active men had lower diastolic blood pressure than inactive men. Consistently active patients (women, -5.27 mg/dL [95% CI, -5.56 to -4.97]; men, -1.45 mg/dL [95% CI, -1.75 to -1.16] and irregularly active patients (women, -4.57 mg/dL [95% CI, -4.80 to -4.34]; men, -0.42 mg/dL [95% CI, -0.66 to -0.19]) had lower fasting glucose than consistently inactive patients. Consistently active and irregularly active men and women also had favorable random glucose and HbA1c compared with consistently inactive patients. Conclusion: Routine clinical physical activity assessment may give health care providers additional information about their patients' cardiometabolic risk factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberE219
JournalPreventing chronic disease
Volume11
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Vital Signs
Exercise
Delivery of Health Care
Confidence Intervals
Glucose
Blood Pressure
Fasting
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Health Personnel
Linear Models
Body Mass Index
Chronic Disease
Smoking
Regression Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy

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Associations between physical activity and cardiometabolic risk factors assessed in a Southern California health care system, 2010-2012. / Young, Deborah Rohm; Coleman, Karen J.; Ngor, Eunis; Reynolds, Kristi; Sidell, Margo; Sallis, Robert E.

In: Preventing chronic disease, Vol. 11, No. 12, E219, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Young, Deborah Rohm ; Coleman, Karen J. ; Ngor, Eunis ; Reynolds, Kristi ; Sidell, Margo ; Sallis, Robert E. / Associations between physical activity and cardiometabolic risk factors assessed in a Southern California health care system, 2010-2012. In: Preventing chronic disease. 2014 ; Vol. 11, No. 12.
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abstract = "Introduction: Risk factors associated with many chronic diseases can be improved through regular physical activity. This study investigated whether cross-sectional associations between physical activity, assessed by the Exercise Vital Sign (EVS), and cardiometabolic risk factors can be detected in clinical settings. Methods: We used electronic records from Kaiser Permanente Southern California members (N = 622,897) to examine the association of EVS category with blood pressure, fasting glucose, random glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin. Adults aged 18 years or older with at least 3 EVS measures between April 2010 and December 2012, without comorbid conditions, and not taking antihypertension or glucose-lowering medications were included. We compared consistently inactive (EVS = 0 min/wk for every measure) with consistently active (EVS ≥150 min/wk) and irregularly active (EVS 1-149 min/wk or not meeting the consistently active or inactive criteria) patients. Separate linear regression analyses were conducted controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, body mass index, and smoking status. Results: Consistently active women had lower systolic (-4.60 mm Hg; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], -4.70 to -4.44) and diastolic (-3.28 mm Hg; 95{\%} CI, -3.40 to -3.17) blood pressure than inactive women. Active men had lower diastolic blood pressure than inactive men. Consistently active patients (women, -5.27 mg/dL [95{\%} CI, -5.56 to -4.97]; men, -1.45 mg/dL [95{\%} CI, -1.75 to -1.16] and irregularly active patients (women, -4.57 mg/dL [95{\%} CI, -4.80 to -4.34]; men, -0.42 mg/dL [95{\%} CI, -0.66 to -0.19]) had lower fasting glucose than consistently inactive patients. Consistently active and irregularly active men and women also had favorable random glucose and HbA1c compared with consistently inactive patients. Conclusion: Routine clinical physical activity assessment may give health care providers additional information about their patients' cardiometabolic risk factors.",
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T1 - Associations between physical activity and cardiometabolic risk factors assessed in a Southern California health care system, 2010-2012

AU - Young, Deborah Rohm

AU - Coleman, Karen J.

AU - Ngor, Eunis

AU - Reynolds, Kristi

AU - Sidell, Margo

AU - Sallis, Robert E.

PY - 2014

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N2 - Introduction: Risk factors associated with many chronic diseases can be improved through regular physical activity. This study investigated whether cross-sectional associations between physical activity, assessed by the Exercise Vital Sign (EVS), and cardiometabolic risk factors can be detected in clinical settings. Methods: We used electronic records from Kaiser Permanente Southern California members (N = 622,897) to examine the association of EVS category with blood pressure, fasting glucose, random glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin. Adults aged 18 years or older with at least 3 EVS measures between April 2010 and December 2012, without comorbid conditions, and not taking antihypertension or glucose-lowering medications were included. We compared consistently inactive (EVS = 0 min/wk for every measure) with consistently active (EVS ≥150 min/wk) and irregularly active (EVS 1-149 min/wk or not meeting the consistently active or inactive criteria) patients. Separate linear regression analyses were conducted controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, body mass index, and smoking status. Results: Consistently active women had lower systolic (-4.60 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval [CI], -4.70 to -4.44) and diastolic (-3.28 mm Hg; 95% CI, -3.40 to -3.17) blood pressure than inactive women. Active men had lower diastolic blood pressure than inactive men. Consistently active patients (women, -5.27 mg/dL [95% CI, -5.56 to -4.97]; men, -1.45 mg/dL [95% CI, -1.75 to -1.16] and irregularly active patients (women, -4.57 mg/dL [95% CI, -4.80 to -4.34]; men, -0.42 mg/dL [95% CI, -0.66 to -0.19]) had lower fasting glucose than consistently inactive patients. Consistently active and irregularly active men and women also had favorable random glucose and HbA1c compared with consistently inactive patients. Conclusion: Routine clinical physical activity assessment may give health care providers additional information about their patients' cardiometabolic risk factors.

AB - Introduction: Risk factors associated with many chronic diseases can be improved through regular physical activity. This study investigated whether cross-sectional associations between physical activity, assessed by the Exercise Vital Sign (EVS), and cardiometabolic risk factors can be detected in clinical settings. Methods: We used electronic records from Kaiser Permanente Southern California members (N = 622,897) to examine the association of EVS category with blood pressure, fasting glucose, random glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin. Adults aged 18 years or older with at least 3 EVS measures between April 2010 and December 2012, without comorbid conditions, and not taking antihypertension or glucose-lowering medications were included. We compared consistently inactive (EVS = 0 min/wk for every measure) with consistently active (EVS ≥150 min/wk) and irregularly active (EVS 1-149 min/wk or not meeting the consistently active or inactive criteria) patients. Separate linear regression analyses were conducted controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, body mass index, and smoking status. Results: Consistently active women had lower systolic (-4.60 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval [CI], -4.70 to -4.44) and diastolic (-3.28 mm Hg; 95% CI, -3.40 to -3.17) blood pressure than inactive women. Active men had lower diastolic blood pressure than inactive men. Consistently active patients (women, -5.27 mg/dL [95% CI, -5.56 to -4.97]; men, -1.45 mg/dL [95% CI, -1.75 to -1.16] and irregularly active patients (women, -4.57 mg/dL [95% CI, -4.80 to -4.34]; men, -0.42 mg/dL [95% CI, -0.66 to -0.19]) had lower fasting glucose than consistently inactive patients. Consistently active and irregularly active men and women also had favorable random glucose and HbA1c compared with consistently inactive patients. Conclusion: Routine clinical physical activity assessment may give health care providers additional information about their patients' cardiometabolic risk factors.

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