Associations between inflammation and cognitive function in African Americans and European Americans

B. Gwen Windham, Brittany N. Simpson, Seth Lirette, John Bridges, Lawrence Bielak, Patricia A. Peyser, Iftikhar Kullo, Stephen Turner, Michael E. Griswold, Thomas H. Mosley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Design Cross-sectional analysis using generalized estimating equations to account for familial clustering; standardized β-coefficients, adjusted for age, sex, and education are reported.

Setting Community cohort study in Jackson, Mississippi, and Rochester, Minnesota.

Participants Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy (GENOA)-Genetics of Microangiopathic Brain Injury (GMBI) Study participants.

Measurements Associations between inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-6, soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1 and 2 (sTNFR1, sTNFR2)) and cognitive function (global, processing speed, language, memory, and executive function) were examined in AAs and EAs (N = 1,965; aged 26-95, 64% women, 52% AA, 75% with hypertension).

Results In AAs, higher sTNFR2 was associated with poorer cognition in all domains (global: -0.11, P =.009; processing speed: -0.11, P

Conclusion In a population with high vascular risk, adverse associations between inflammation and cognitive function were especially apparent in AAs, primarily involving markers of TNFα activity.

Objectives To examine associations between specific inflammatory biomarkers and cognitive function in African Americans (AAs) and European Americans (EAs) with prevalent vascular risk factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2303-2310
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume62
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • cognition
  • ethnicity
  • inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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  • Cite this

    Windham, B. G., Simpson, B. N., Lirette, S., Bridges, J., Bielak, L., Peyser, P. A., Kullo, I., Turner, S., Griswold, M. E., & Mosley, T. H. (2014). Associations between inflammation and cognitive function in African Americans and European Americans. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 62(12), 2303-2310. https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.13165