Associations between community-level disaster exposure and individual-level changes in disability and risk of death for older Americans

Samuel L. Brilleman, Rory Wolfe, Margarita Moreno-Betancur, Anne E. Sales, Kenneth M. Langa, Yun Li, Elizabeth L. Daugherty Biddison, Lewis Rubinson, Theodore J. Iwashyna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Disasters occur frequently in the United States (US) and their impact on acute morbidity, mortality and short-term increased health needs has been well described. However, barring mental health, little is known about the medium or longer-term health impacts of disasters. This study sought to determine if there is an association between community-level disaster exposure and individual-level changes in disability and/or the risk of death for older Americans. Using the US Federal Emergency Management Agency's database of disaster declarations, 602 disasters occurred between August 1998 and December 2010 and were characterized by their presence, intensity, duration and type. Repeated measurements of a disability score (based on activities of daily living) and dates of death were observed between January 2000 and November 2010 for 18,102 American individuals aged 50–89 years, who were participating in the national longitudinal Health and Retirement Study. Longitudinal (disability) and time-to-event (death) data were modelled simultaneously using a ‘joint modelling’ approach. There was no evidence of an association between community-level disaster exposure and individual-level changes in disability or the risk of death. Our results suggest that future research should focus on individual-level disaster exposures, moderate to severe disaster events, or higher-risk groups of individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)118-125
Number of pages8
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume173
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Keywords

  • Death
  • Disability
  • Disaster
  • Health and Retirement Study
  • Joint model
  • Shared parameter model
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

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