Association of vagal tone with serum insulin, glucose, and diabetes mellitus - The ARIC Study

Duanping Liao, Jianwen Cai, Frederick L. Brancati, Aaron Folsom, Ralph W. Barnes, Herman A. Tyroler, Gerardo Heiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Reduced vagal activity assessed by heart rate variability (HRV) has been observed in studies of diabetics, but this association has not been reported at the population level. To investigate the association of HRV with diabetes mellitus, as well as fasting serum insulin, and glucose, we examined a stratified random sample of 1933 individuals (154 diabetics and 1779 non-diabetics), aged 45-65 years from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study cohort. Two-minute, resting, supine beat-to-beat heart rate records were collected. Power spectral density estimation was used to derive HRV high frequency power (HF, 0.15-0.35 Hz) as the conventional marker of vagal function. Age, race, and gender-adjusted geometric means of HF were 0.78 and 1.27 (beat/min)2 for diabetics and non-diabetics respectively (P for mean difference <0.01), reflecting a reduced vagal activity in diabetics. In individuals not diagnosed as diabetics, a graded, inverse association was observed between fasting serum insulin and HF (P for trend <0.01): the age, race, and gender-adjusted geometric mean values of HF in the lowest and highest quartiles of serum insulin were 1.34 and 1.14 (beat/minute)2, respectively. A similar association was observed between glucose and HF in a univariate model, but not in the adjusted model. This first population-based study on this subject confirmed that diabetics have significantly lower vagal activity than non-diabetics. In individuals not diagnosed as diabetics, serum insulin, and, to a lesser degree, serum glucose were inversely associated with vagal function, suggesting a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-221
Number of pages11
JournalDiabetes Research and Clinical Practice
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Atherosclerosis
Diabetes Mellitus
Insulin
Glucose
Heart Rate
Serum
Fasting
Diabetic Neuropathies
Population
Cohort Studies
Power (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Diabetic neuropathy
  • Glucose
  • Heart rate variability
  • Insulin
  • Parasympathetic function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Liao, D., Cai, J., Brancati, F. L., Folsom, A., Barnes, R. W., Tyroler, H. A., & Heiss, G. (1995). Association of vagal tone with serum insulin, glucose, and diabetes mellitus - The ARIC Study. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 30(3), 211-221. https://doi.org/10.1016/0168-8227(95)01190-0

Association of vagal tone with serum insulin, glucose, and diabetes mellitus - The ARIC Study. / Liao, Duanping; Cai, Jianwen; Brancati, Frederick L.; Folsom, Aaron; Barnes, Ralph W.; Tyroler, Herman A.; Heiss, Gerardo.

In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, Vol. 30, No. 3, 1995, p. 211-221.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Liao, D, Cai, J, Brancati, FL, Folsom, A, Barnes, RW, Tyroler, HA & Heiss, G 1995, 'Association of vagal tone with serum insulin, glucose, and diabetes mellitus - The ARIC Study', Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 211-221. https://doi.org/10.1016/0168-8227(95)01190-0
Liao, Duanping ; Cai, Jianwen ; Brancati, Frederick L. ; Folsom, Aaron ; Barnes, Ralph W. ; Tyroler, Herman A. ; Heiss, Gerardo. / Association of vagal tone with serum insulin, glucose, and diabetes mellitus - The ARIC Study. In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice. 1995 ; Vol. 30, No. 3. pp. 211-221.
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