Association of tattooing and hepatitis C virus infection

A multicenter case-control study

Kerrilynn Carney, Sameer Dhalla, Ayse Aytaman, Craig T. Tenner, Fritz Francois

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although injection drug use (IDU) and blood transfusions prior to 1992 are well-accepted risk factors for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, many studies that evaluated tattooing as a risk factor for HCV infection did not control for a history of IDU or transfusion prior to 1992. In this large, multicenter, case-control study, we analyzed demographic and HCV risk factor exposure history data from 3,871 patients, including 1,930 with chronic HCV infection (HCV RNA-positive) and 1,941 HCV-negative (HCV antibody-negative) controls. Crude and fully adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of tattoo exposure by multivariate logistic regression in HCV-infected versus controls were determined. As expected, IDU (65.9% versus 17.8%; P <0.001), blood transfusion prior to 1992 (22.3% versus 11.1%; P <0.001), and history of having one or more tattoos (OR, 3.81; 95% CI, 3.23-4.49; P <0.001) were more common in HCV-infected patients than in control subjects. After excluding all patients with a history of ever injecting drugs and those who had a blood transfusion prior to 1992, a total of 1,886 subjects remained for analysis (465 HCV-positive patients and 1,421 controls). Among these individuals without traditional risk factors, HCV-positive patients remained significantly more likely to have a history of one or more tattoos after adjustment for age, sex, and race/ethnicity (OR, 5.17; 95% CI, 3.75-7.11; P <0.001). Conclusion: Tattooing is associated with HCV infection, even among those without traditional HCV risk factors such as IDU and blood transfusion prior to 1992.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2117-2123
Number of pages7
JournalHepatology
Volume57
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013

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Tattooing
Virus Diseases
Hepacivirus
Case-Control Studies
Blood Transfusion
Injections
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Odds Ratio
Hepatitis C Antibodies
Chronic Hepatitis C
Infection Control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

Cite this

Carney, K., Dhalla, S., Aytaman, A., Tenner, C. T., & Francois, F. (2013). Association of tattooing and hepatitis C virus infection: A multicenter case-control study. Hepatology, 57(6), 2117-2123. https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.26245

Association of tattooing and hepatitis C virus infection : A multicenter case-control study. / Carney, Kerrilynn; Dhalla, Sameer; Aytaman, Ayse; Tenner, Craig T.; Francois, Fritz.

In: Hepatology, Vol. 57, No. 6, 06.2013, p. 2117-2123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carney, K, Dhalla, S, Aytaman, A, Tenner, CT & Francois, F 2013, 'Association of tattooing and hepatitis C virus infection: A multicenter case-control study', Hepatology, vol. 57, no. 6, pp. 2117-2123. https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.26245
Carney, Kerrilynn ; Dhalla, Sameer ; Aytaman, Ayse ; Tenner, Craig T. ; Francois, Fritz. / Association of tattooing and hepatitis C virus infection : A multicenter case-control study. In: Hepatology. 2013 ; Vol. 57, No. 6. pp. 2117-2123.
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abstract = "Although injection drug use (IDU) and blood transfusions prior to 1992 are well-accepted risk factors for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, many studies that evaluated tattooing as a risk factor for HCV infection did not control for a history of IDU or transfusion prior to 1992. In this large, multicenter, case-control study, we analyzed demographic and HCV risk factor exposure history data from 3,871 patients, including 1,930 with chronic HCV infection (HCV RNA-positive) and 1,941 HCV-negative (HCV antibody-negative) controls. Crude and fully adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of tattoo exposure by multivariate logistic regression in HCV-infected versus controls were determined. As expected, IDU (65.9{\%} versus 17.8{\%}; P <0.001), blood transfusion prior to 1992 (22.3{\%} versus 11.1{\%}; P <0.001), and history of having one or more tattoos (OR, 3.81; 95{\%} CI, 3.23-4.49; P <0.001) were more common in HCV-infected patients than in control subjects. After excluding all patients with a history of ever injecting drugs and those who had a blood transfusion prior to 1992, a total of 1,886 subjects remained for analysis (465 HCV-positive patients and 1,421 controls). Among these individuals without traditional risk factors, HCV-positive patients remained significantly more likely to have a history of one or more tattoos after adjustment for age, sex, and race/ethnicity (OR, 5.17; 95{\%} CI, 3.75-7.11; P <0.001). Conclusion: Tattooing is associated with HCV infection, even among those without traditional HCV risk factors such as IDU and blood transfusion prior to 1992.",
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