Association of social problem solving with glycemic control in a sample of urban African Americans with type 2 diabetes

Felicia Hill-Briggs, Tiffany L. Gary, Hsin Chieh Yeh, Marian Batts-Turner, Neil R. Powe, Christopher D. Saudek, Frederick L. Brancati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Social Problem-Solving Inventory - Revised, Short Form, was administered to 65 urban African Americans with type 2 diabetes to examine association of generic problem-solving styles and orientation with hemoglobin A1C (A1C). Eighty-five percent of participants had total social problem-solving scores in the Average range or higher. In linear regression models adjusted for education, each interquartile increase in impulsive/careless score was associated with a 0.82 increase in A1C (%) (p = 0.01), and each interquartile increase in avoidant score was associated with a 1.62 Increase in A1C (%) (p = 0.004). After adjusting for depressive symptoms, the association of impulsive/careless style with A1C was attenuated, while the association of avoidant problem solving with A1C remained significant (p = 0.01). Associations of rational problem-solving style, positive orientation, and negative orientation with A1C and health behaviors were not statistically significant. Ineffective problem-solving styles may prove to be important targets for intervention to improve glycemic control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-78
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2006

Keywords

  • Disease control
  • Health behaviors
  • Minorities
  • Problem solving
  • Self-management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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