Association of resting heart rate with carotid and aortic arterial stiffness

Multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis

Seamus Whelton, Ron Blankstein, Mouaz H. Al-Mallah, Joao Lima, David A. Bluemke, W. Gregory Hundley, Joseph F. Polak, Roger S Blumenthal, Khurram Nasir, Michael Blaha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Resting heart rate is an easily measured, noninvasive vital sign that is associated with cardiovascular disease events. The pathophysiology of this association is not known. We investigated the relationship between resting heart rate and stiffness of the carotid (a peripheral artery) and the aorta (a central artery) in an asymptomatic multi-ethnic population. Resting heart rate was recorded at baseline in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Distensibility was used as a measure of arterial elasticity, with a lower distensibility indicating an increase in arterial stiffness. Carotid distensibility was measured in 6484 participants (98% of participants) using B-mode ultrasound, and aortic distensibility was measured in 3512 participants (53% of participants) using cardiac MRI. Heart rate was divided into quintiles and we used progressively adjusted models that included terms for physical activity and atrioventricular nodal blocking agents. Mean resting heart rate of participants (mean age, 62 years; 47% men) was 63 bpm (SD, 9.6 bpm). In unadjusted and fully adjusted models, carotid distensibility and aortic distensibility decreased monotonically with increasing resting heart rate (P for trend

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)477-484
Number of pages8
JournalHypertension
Volume62
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

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Vascular Stiffness
Atherosclerosis
Heart Rate
Arteries
Vital Signs
Elasticity
Aorta
Cardiovascular Diseases
Exercise
Population

Keywords

  • cardiovascular diseases
  • heart rate
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • ultrasonography
  • vascular stiffness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Association of resting heart rate with carotid and aortic arterial stiffness : Multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis. / Whelton, Seamus; Blankstein, Ron; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H.; Lima, Joao; Bluemke, David A.; Hundley, W. Gregory; Polak, Joseph F.; Blumenthal, Roger S; Nasir, Khurram; Blaha, Michael.

In: Hypertension, Vol. 62, No. 3, 09.2013, p. 477-484.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Whelton, Seamus ; Blankstein, Ron ; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H. ; Lima, Joao ; Bluemke, David A. ; Hundley, W. Gregory ; Polak, Joseph F. ; Blumenthal, Roger S ; Nasir, Khurram ; Blaha, Michael. / Association of resting heart rate with carotid and aortic arterial stiffness : Multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis. In: Hypertension. 2013 ; Vol. 62, No. 3. pp. 477-484.
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