Association of Physical Activity and Renal Function in Subjects With and Without Metabolic Syndrome: A Review of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III)

Joseph Finkelstein, Ashish Joshi, Michael K. Hise

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The association between physical activity and renal function in subjects with and without metabolic syndrome was examined. Methods: Renal function was evaluated in subjects of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey by using calculated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urine microalbuminuria (urine albumin-creatinine ratio). These parameters were studied as a function of physical activity by using a 1-month recall. Measures included activity variety, number of different types of exertion; activity frequency, the sum of all activity periods; and metabolic equivalent (METS), the total sum of energy expenditures. Individuals were segregated into those with metabolic syndrome and no metabolic syndrome; ages 18 to 44, 45 to 55, and older than 55 years; men and women; and 3 racial groups: Caucasians, African Americans, and Mexican Americans. Results: Younger individuals, men, and those with higher levels of education had a lower risk for metabolic syndrome. The groups also had better renal function, measured by using GFR and urinary protein. Those without metabolic syndrome performed larger numbers of activity varieties in the unadjusted analysis (2 ± 2 [SD]; n = 11,184) compared with those with metabolic syndrome (1 ± 1; n = 2,569; P <0.0001). Similar differences in activity frequency and METS also were observed. Conversely, GFR correlated with activity variety and METS, but negatively with activity frequency in those without metabolic syndrome after adjustment for confounders. In subjects with metabolic syndrome, GFR correlated only with activity variety. Variable observations were made among ages, sexes, and races. Conclusion: There is a clear association between physical activity and GFR, particularly in subjects without metabolic syndrome; however, cross-sectional analysis precludes establishing causality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)372-382
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Kidney Diseases
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nutrition Surveys
Exercise
Kidney
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Urine
Metabolic Equivalent
Causality
African Americans
Energy Metabolism
Albumins
Creatinine
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education

Keywords

  • glomerular filtration rate
  • metabolic syndrome
  • METS
  • physical activity
  • proteinuria
  • Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Association of Physical Activity and Renal Function in Subjects With and Without Metabolic Syndrome : A Review of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). / Finkelstein, Joseph; Joshi, Ashish; Hise, Michael K.

In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Vol. 48, No. 3, 09.2006, p. 372-382.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{477a0e8ad2f94c088109e8d9f8c9d324,
title = "Association of Physical Activity and Renal Function in Subjects With and Without Metabolic Syndrome: A Review of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III)",
abstract = "Background: The association between physical activity and renal function in subjects with and without metabolic syndrome was examined. Methods: Renal function was evaluated in subjects of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey by using calculated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urine microalbuminuria (urine albumin-creatinine ratio). These parameters were studied as a function of physical activity by using a 1-month recall. Measures included activity variety, number of different types of exertion; activity frequency, the sum of all activity periods; and metabolic equivalent (METS), the total sum of energy expenditures. Individuals were segregated into those with metabolic syndrome and no metabolic syndrome; ages 18 to 44, 45 to 55, and older than 55 years; men and women; and 3 racial groups: Caucasians, African Americans, and Mexican Americans. Results: Younger individuals, men, and those with higher levels of education had a lower risk for metabolic syndrome. The groups also had better renal function, measured by using GFR and urinary protein. Those without metabolic syndrome performed larger numbers of activity varieties in the unadjusted analysis (2 ± 2 [SD]; n = 11,184) compared with those with metabolic syndrome (1 ± 1; n = 2,569; P <0.0001). Similar differences in activity frequency and METS also were observed. Conversely, GFR correlated with activity variety and METS, but negatively with activity frequency in those without metabolic syndrome after adjustment for confounders. In subjects with metabolic syndrome, GFR correlated only with activity variety. Variable observations were made among ages, sexes, and races. Conclusion: There is a clear association between physical activity and GFR, particularly in subjects without metabolic syndrome; however, cross-sectional analysis precludes establishing causality.",
keywords = "glomerular filtration rate, metabolic syndrome, METS, physical activity, proteinuria, Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III)",
author = "Joseph Finkelstein and Ashish Joshi and Hise, {Michael K.}",
year = "2006",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1053/j.ajkd.2006.05.013",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "48",
pages = "372--382",
journal = "American Journal of Kidney Diseases",
issn = "0272-6386",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association of Physical Activity and Renal Function in Subjects With and Without Metabolic Syndrome

T2 - A Review of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III)

AU - Finkelstein, Joseph

AU - Joshi, Ashish

AU - Hise, Michael K.

PY - 2006/9

Y1 - 2006/9

N2 - Background: The association between physical activity and renal function in subjects with and without metabolic syndrome was examined. Methods: Renal function was evaluated in subjects of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey by using calculated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urine microalbuminuria (urine albumin-creatinine ratio). These parameters were studied as a function of physical activity by using a 1-month recall. Measures included activity variety, number of different types of exertion; activity frequency, the sum of all activity periods; and metabolic equivalent (METS), the total sum of energy expenditures. Individuals were segregated into those with metabolic syndrome and no metabolic syndrome; ages 18 to 44, 45 to 55, and older than 55 years; men and women; and 3 racial groups: Caucasians, African Americans, and Mexican Americans. Results: Younger individuals, men, and those with higher levels of education had a lower risk for metabolic syndrome. The groups also had better renal function, measured by using GFR and urinary protein. Those without metabolic syndrome performed larger numbers of activity varieties in the unadjusted analysis (2 ± 2 [SD]; n = 11,184) compared with those with metabolic syndrome (1 ± 1; n = 2,569; P <0.0001). Similar differences in activity frequency and METS also were observed. Conversely, GFR correlated with activity variety and METS, but negatively with activity frequency in those without metabolic syndrome after adjustment for confounders. In subjects with metabolic syndrome, GFR correlated only with activity variety. Variable observations were made among ages, sexes, and races. Conclusion: There is a clear association between physical activity and GFR, particularly in subjects without metabolic syndrome; however, cross-sectional analysis precludes establishing causality.

AB - Background: The association between physical activity and renal function in subjects with and without metabolic syndrome was examined. Methods: Renal function was evaluated in subjects of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey by using calculated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urine microalbuminuria (urine albumin-creatinine ratio). These parameters were studied as a function of physical activity by using a 1-month recall. Measures included activity variety, number of different types of exertion; activity frequency, the sum of all activity periods; and metabolic equivalent (METS), the total sum of energy expenditures. Individuals were segregated into those with metabolic syndrome and no metabolic syndrome; ages 18 to 44, 45 to 55, and older than 55 years; men and women; and 3 racial groups: Caucasians, African Americans, and Mexican Americans. Results: Younger individuals, men, and those with higher levels of education had a lower risk for metabolic syndrome. The groups also had better renal function, measured by using GFR and urinary protein. Those without metabolic syndrome performed larger numbers of activity varieties in the unadjusted analysis (2 ± 2 [SD]; n = 11,184) compared with those with metabolic syndrome (1 ± 1; n = 2,569; P <0.0001). Similar differences in activity frequency and METS also were observed. Conversely, GFR correlated with activity variety and METS, but negatively with activity frequency in those without metabolic syndrome after adjustment for confounders. In subjects with metabolic syndrome, GFR correlated only with activity variety. Variable observations were made among ages, sexes, and races. Conclusion: There is a clear association between physical activity and GFR, particularly in subjects without metabolic syndrome; however, cross-sectional analysis precludes establishing causality.

KW - glomerular filtration rate

KW - metabolic syndrome

KW - METS

KW - physical activity

KW - proteinuria

KW - Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III)

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33747616193&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33747616193&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1053/j.ajkd.2006.05.013

DO - 10.1053/j.ajkd.2006.05.013

M3 - Article

C2 - 16931210

AN - SCOPUS:33747616193

VL - 48

SP - 372

EP - 382

JO - American Journal of Kidney Diseases

JF - American Journal of Kidney Diseases

SN - 0272-6386

IS - 3

ER -