Association of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin with cognitive performance in middle-aged adults

James M. Peacock, Aaron R. Folsom, David S. Knopman, Thomas H. Mosley, David C. Goff, Moyses Szklo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To assess the cross-sectional association of regular use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or aspirin with cognitive function in 13,153 individuals, aged 48-67 years, participating in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Methods: Regular use of NSAIDs or aspirin was analyzed in relation to the results of three cognitive tests, the Delayed Word Recall Test, the WAIS-R Digit Symbol Subtest, and the Word Fluency Test. Results: After adjustment for covariates previously found to be associated with cognition in this sample, we found a weak negative association between current use of aspirin and poor Word Recall [OR = 0.84 (95% confidence interval: 0.68-1.04)] and poor Word Fluency [OR = 0.85 (0.70- 1.03)]. We found no association between current use of aspirin and Digit Symbol score, nor did we find current NSAID use to be significantly associated with any of the cognitive tests. Conclusions: This study suggests a modest association, at best, between NSAIDs or aspirin and better cognitive function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)134-143
Number of pages10
JournalNeuroepidemiology
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

Keywords

  • Aspirin
  • Cognition
  • Cross-sectional study
  • Epidemiology
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Clinical Neurology

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