Association of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with subclinical myocardial remodeling and dysfunction

A population-based study

Lisa B. Vanwagner, Jane E. Wilcox, Laura A. Colangelo, Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, J. Jeffrey Carr, Joao Lima, Cora E. Lewis, Mary E. Rinella, Sanjiv J. Shah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and heart failure (HF) are obesity-related conditions with high cardiovascular mortality. Whether NAFLD is independently associated with subclinical myocardial remodeling or dysfunction among the general population is unknown. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 2,713 participants from the multicenter, community-based Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study who underwent concurrent computed tomography (CT) quantification of liver fat and comprehensive echocardiography with myocardial strain measured by speckle tracking during the Year-25 examination (age, 43-55 years; 58.8% female and 48.0% black). NAFLD was defined as liver attenuation ≤40 Hounsfield units after excluding other causes of liver fat. Subclinical left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction was defined using values of absolute peak global longitudinal strain (GLS). Diastolic dysfunction was defined using Doppler and tissue Doppler imaging markers. Prevalence of NAFLD was 10.0%. Participants with NAFLD had lower early diastolic relaxation (e') velocity (10.8±2.6 vs. 11.9±2.8 cm/s), higher LV filling pressure (E/e' ratio: 7.7±2.6 vs. 7.0±2.3), and worse absolute GLS (14.2±2.4% vs. 15.2±2.4%) than non-NAFLD (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)773-783
Number of pages11
JournalHepatology
Volume62
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

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Population
Liver
Fats
Liver Failure
Left Ventricular Dysfunction
Ventricular Pressure
Fatty Liver
Echocardiography
Liver Diseases
Young Adult
Coronary Vessels
Heart Failure
Obesity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Tomography
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

Cite this

Vanwagner, L. B., Wilcox, J. E., Colangelo, L. A., Lloyd-Jones, D. M., Carr, J. J., Lima, J., ... Shah, S. J. (2015). Association of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with subclinical myocardial remodeling and dysfunction: A population-based study. Hepatology, 62(3), 773-783. https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.27869

Association of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with subclinical myocardial remodeling and dysfunction : A population-based study. / Vanwagner, Lisa B.; Wilcox, Jane E.; Colangelo, Laura A.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Lima, Joao; Lewis, Cora E.; Rinella, Mary E.; Shah, Sanjiv J.

In: Hepatology, Vol. 62, No. 3, 01.09.2015, p. 773-783.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vanwagner, LB, Wilcox, JE, Colangelo, LA, Lloyd-Jones, DM, Carr, JJ, Lima, J, Lewis, CE, Rinella, ME & Shah, SJ 2015, 'Association of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with subclinical myocardial remodeling and dysfunction: A population-based study', Hepatology, vol. 62, no. 3, pp. 773-783. https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.27869
Vanwagner, Lisa B. ; Wilcox, Jane E. ; Colangelo, Laura A. ; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M. ; Carr, J. Jeffrey ; Lima, Joao ; Lewis, Cora E. ; Rinella, Mary E. ; Shah, Sanjiv J. / Association of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with subclinical myocardial remodeling and dysfunction : A population-based study. In: Hepatology. 2015 ; Vol. 62, No. 3. pp. 773-783.
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