Association of new opioid continuation with surgical specialty and type in the United States

Mark Bicket, Irene B. Murimi, Omar Mansour, Christopher L. Wu, George Caleb Alexander

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The consequences of opioids—including post-surgical prescriptions—remain a critical public health issue. We sought to determine how procedure type and subspecialty group influence new opioid use after procedures. Methods: We analyzed 2011–2015 IBM MarketScan Research Databases to identify opioid-naïve adults prescribed opioids for single surgical procedures. We defined new opioid continuation (primary outcome) a priori as receipt of prescription opioids between 90 and 180 days after the procedure. Results: Among 912,882 individuals, new opioid continuation was higher for non-operating room compared to operating room procedures (13.1% versus 9.2%; aOR 1.61; 95% CI 1.59–1.64) and higher for subspecialties including colorectal surgery (aOR 1.35; 95% CI 1.26–1.43) and cardiovascular surgery (aOR 1.30; 95% CI 1.12–1.50) compared to urology as a referent. New opioid continuation was also associated with perioperative opioid prescription dosage, days’ supply, preoperative receipt, and multiple prescriptions. Conclusions: Opioids prescriptions associated with non-operating room surgical exposures appear to confer higher risk regarding conversion to new long-term opioid use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican journal of surgery
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Surgical Specialties
Opioid Analgesics
Prescriptions
Colorectal Surgery
Urology
Operating Rooms
Public Health
Databases

Keywords

  • Analgesics
  • Cohort studies
  • Operative
  • Opioid
  • Pain
  • Postoperative/drug therapy
  • Surgical procedures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Association of new opioid continuation with surgical specialty and type in the United States. / Bicket, Mark; Murimi, Irene B.; Mansour, Omar; Wu, Christopher L.; Alexander, George Caleb.

In: American journal of surgery, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: The consequences of opioids—including post-surgical prescriptions—remain a critical public health issue. We sought to determine how procedure type and subspecialty group influence new opioid use after procedures. Methods: We analyzed 2011–2015 IBM MarketScan Research Databases to identify opioid-na{\"i}ve adults prescribed opioids for single surgical procedures. We defined new opioid continuation (primary outcome) a priori as receipt of prescription opioids between 90 and 180 days after the procedure. Results: Among 912,882 individuals, new opioid continuation was higher for non-operating room compared to operating room procedures (13.1{\%} versus 9.2{\%}; aOR 1.61; 95{\%} CI 1.59–1.64) and higher for subspecialties including colorectal surgery (aOR 1.35; 95{\%} CI 1.26–1.43) and cardiovascular surgery (aOR 1.30; 95{\%} CI 1.12–1.50) compared to urology as a referent. New opioid continuation was also associated with perioperative opioid prescription dosage, days’ supply, preoperative receipt, and multiple prescriptions. Conclusions: Opioids prescriptions associated with non-operating room surgical exposures appear to confer higher risk regarding conversion to new long-term opioid use.",
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