Association of markers of chronic viral hepatitis and blood mercury levels in US reproductive-age women from NHANES 2001-2008: A cross-sectional study

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Abstract

Background: Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxin primarily found in seafood; exposures in reproductive-age women are of concern due to vulnerability of the developing fetus. MeHg is mainly eliminated via an enterohepatic cycle involving the liver and gallbladder. Dysfunction in these organs has been associated with slower MeHg elimination in laboratory animals. We hypothesized that women testing positive for chronic hepatitis B (HBV) or C (HCV), both associated with risk of longer-term liver and gallbladder impairment, would have higher total blood mercury (TBHg) concentrations than those negative for the viruses, reflecting slower MeHg elimination. Methods. Geometric mean (GM) TBHg levels from a representative sample of over 5,000 seafood-consuming, reproductive-age women from eight years (2001-2008) of the US NHANES survey were compared by viral hepatitis status (as determined by serological assay) using multiple linear regression. Adjustment was made for estimated MeHg intake from seafood consumption, social and demographic variables and other predictors. Results: Women with chronic HBV had 1.52 (95% CI 1.13, 2.05, p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number62
JournalEnvironmental Health: A Global Access Science Source
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

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Keywords

  • Biomonitoring
  • Developmental neurotoxicity
  • Hepatitis
  • Mercury
  • NHANES
  • Reproductive-age women
  • Seafood
  • Susceptibility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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