Association of Household Savings and Expected Future Means with Delivery Using a Skilled Birth Attendant in Ghana and Nigeria: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

Larissa Jennings Mayo-Wilson, Fan Yang, Easmon Otupiri, Ambrose Akinlo, Michael Okunlola, Michelle Hindin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives This study examined the association between household savings and related economic measures with utilization of skilled birth attendants (SBAs) at last birth among women living in peri-urban households (n = 381) in Ghana and Nigeria. Methods Data were drawn from the 2011–2014 Family Health and Wealth Study. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds of delivery with an SBA for individual and composite measures of household savings, expected financial means, debt, lending, and receipt of financial assistance, adjusting for demographic and reproductive characteristics. Results Seventy-three percent (73 %) of women delivered with an SBA during their last birth (89 %, Ghana; 63 %, Nigeria), and roughly one third (34 %) of households reported having any in-cash or in-kind savings. In adjusted analyses, women living in households with savings were significantly more likely to deliver with an SBA compared to women in households without any savings (aOR = 2.02, 95 % CI 1.09–3.73). There was also a consistent downward trend, although non-significant, in SBA utilization with worsening financial expectations in the coming year (somewhat vs. much better: aOR = 0.70, 95 % CI 0.40–1.22 and no change/worse vs. much better: aOR = 0.46, 95 % CI 0.12–1.83). Findings were null for measures relating to debt, lending, and financial assistance. Conclusion Coupling birth preparedness and complication readiness strategies with savings-led initiatives may improve SBA utilization in conjunction with targeting non-economic barriers to skilled care use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalMaternal and Child Health Journal
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jul 27 2016

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Ghana
Nigeria
Cross-Sectional Studies
Parturition
Logistic Models
Family Health
Economics
Demography

Keywords

  • Birth preparedness
  • Economic
  • Institutional delivery
  • Obstetric
  • Savings
  • Skilled birth attendance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Association of Household Savings and Expected Future Means with Delivery Using a Skilled Birth Attendant in Ghana and Nigeria : A Cross-Sectional Analysis. / Mayo-Wilson, Larissa Jennings; Yang, Fan; Otupiri, Easmon; Akinlo, Ambrose; Okunlola, Michael; Hindin, Michelle.

In: Maternal and Child Health Journal, 27.07.2016, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mayo-Wilson, Larissa Jennings ; Yang, Fan ; Otupiri, Easmon ; Akinlo, Ambrose ; Okunlola, Michael ; Hindin, Michelle. / Association of Household Savings and Expected Future Means with Delivery Using a Skilled Birth Attendant in Ghana and Nigeria : A Cross-Sectional Analysis. In: Maternal and Child Health Journal. 2016 ; pp. 1-11.
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