Association of Hepatitis C Virus Infection with Proteinuria and Glomerular Filtration Rate

Nargiza Kurbanova, Rehan Qayyum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: Despite several studies, the extent to which hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains controversial. Thus, we examined the relationship between HCV and CKD using the continuous National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999-2012). Methods: Specimens positive for anti-HCV antibodies were retested and confirmed with recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA). Proteinuria was defined as urine albumin creatinine ratio > 30 mg/g. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2. We used linear and logistic regression models to examine the association between HCV and outcomes with and without adjustment for age, sex, race, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and body mass index and accounting for the complex survey design. Results: Of the 33,729 eligible participants, HCV infection was present in 659 (1.73%). In unadjusted and adjusted analyses, HCV was associated with proteinuria (OR = 1.40, p = 0.01 and OR = 1.50, p = 0.02, respectively). In both unadjusted and adjusted analyses, individuals with HCV had significantly higher GFR than individuals without (1.4 mL/min, p = 0.04 and 2.7 mL/min, p <0.001, respectively). We did not find an association of HCV with CKD in adjusted or unadjusted analyses. Conclusion: HCV infection is associated with proteinuria and high GFR but not with CKD. The biological mechanism of the observed association needs further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)421-424
Number of pages4
JournalClinical and Translational Science
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Virus Diseases
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Viruses
Proteinuria
Hepacivirus
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Association reactions
Logistic Models
Hepatitis C Antibodies
Nutrition Surveys
Nutrition
Medical problems
Logistics
Albumins
Linear Models
Assays
Creatinine
Diabetes Mellitus
Body Mass Index
Health

Keywords

  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Glomerular filtration rate
  • Hepatitis C virus
  • Proteinuria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Association of Hepatitis C Virus Infection with Proteinuria and Glomerular Filtration Rate. / Kurbanova, Nargiza; Qayyum, Rehan.

In: Clinical and Translational Science, Vol. 8, No. 5, 01.10.2015, p. 421-424.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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