Association of Disposable Perioperative Jackets with Surgical Site Infections in a Large Multicenter Health Care Organization

Erik J. Stapleton, Nicholas Frane, Jonathon M. Lentz, Donna Armellino, Nina Kohn, Rosemarie Linton, Adam D. Bitterman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Importance: To help prevent surgical site infections (SSIs), recommendations by a national organization led to implementation of a mandatory operating room policy in a large multicenter health care organization of required use of disposable perioperative jackets. Objective: To assess whether the use of perioperative disposable jackets is associated with the incidence of SSIs. Design, Setting, and Participants: Surgical site infection data for patients undergoing clean surgical procedures were retrospectively reviewed from 12 hospitals in a large multicenter health care organization during a 55-month period from January 1, 2014, to July 31, 2018. The incidence of SSI was analyzed for all National Healthcare Safety Network monitored and reported procedures. The patient population was split into 2 groups; the preintervention group consisted of 29098 patients within the 26 months before the policy starting March 1, 2016, and the postintervention group consisted of 30911 patients within 26 months after the policy. Main Outcome and Measures: Comparison of the incidence of SSIs before and after intervention periods underwent statistical analysis. The total number of disposable jackets purchased and total expenditures were also calculated. Exposures: Implementation of the mandated perioperative attire policy. Results: A total of 60009 patients (mean [SD] age, 62.8 [13.9] years; 32 139 [53.6%] male) were included in the study. The overall SSI incidence for clean wounds was 0.87% before policy implementation and 0.83% after policy implementation, which was not found to be significant (odds ratio [OR], 0.96; 95% CI, 0.80-1.14; P =.61). After accounting for possible confounding variables, a multivariable analysis demonstrated no significant reduction in SSIs (OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.71-1.01; P =.07). During the postintervention study period (26 months), a total of 2010040 jackets were purchased, which amounted to a cost of 1709898.46. Conclusions and Relevance: The results of this study suggest that the use of perioperative disposable jackets is not associated with reductions in SSI for clean wounds in a large multicenter health care organization and presents a fiscal burden.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-20
Number of pages6
JournalJAMA surgery
Volume155
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2020
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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