Association of cardiovascular risk factor clustering and prehypertension among adults:Results from the China health and retirement longitudinal study baseline

Liya Tang, Qiheng Zhao, Wenwen Han, Kun Li, Junxin Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Prehypertension is common in China, but its causes and associated factors have not been well studied. This study aimed to examine the age and gender-specific associations between CVD risk factor clustering and prehypertension among adults in China. Methods: This cross-sectional study used data from participants (n = 8735) aged over 45 in the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) Baseline conducted from 2011–2012. The participants’ data were collected using standard questionnaires, anthropometric, and biochemical tests. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the associations between cardiovascular risk factors, their clustering and prehypertension. Results: Overall, 21.1%, 39.5%, 27.6% and 11.8% participants had 0, 1, 2, ≥ 3 CVD risk factors in prehypertension group, respectively. Diabetes and overweight/obesity were significantly associated with prehypertension (OR, 1.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06–1.44; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.38–1.75) in the overall population, and diabetes was associated with prehypertension only in men (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.00–1.58) and older adults (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.03–1.69). Moreover, participants with 1, 2 and ≥3 risk factors had increased odds of having prehypertension (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.12–1.49; OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.31–1.78; OR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.66–2.53, respectively) and existed dose-response relationship, regardless of age and gender. Conclusions: This study indicated that CVD risk factor clustering was significantly associated with prehypertension and hypertension. These results provide valuable information for health professionals to better understand the impact of CVD risk factor clustering on prehypertension and hypertension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical and Experimental Hypertension
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Prehypertension
Retirement
Cluster Analysis
Longitudinal Studies
China
Health
Confidence Intervals
Hypertension
Obesity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • clustering
  • hypertension
  • Prehypertension
  • risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology

Cite this

@article{bf11db5e7d814c748a79f7c3c0c6ccd7,
title = "Association of cardiovascular risk factor clustering and prehypertension among adults:Results from the China health and retirement longitudinal study baseline",
abstract = "Background: Prehypertension is common in China, but its causes and associated factors have not been well studied. This study aimed to examine the age and gender-specific associations between CVD risk factor clustering and prehypertension among adults in China. Methods: This cross-sectional study used data from participants (n = 8735) aged over 45 in the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) Baseline conducted from 2011–2012. The participants’ data were collected using standard questionnaires, anthropometric, and biochemical tests. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the associations between cardiovascular risk factors, their clustering and prehypertension. Results: Overall, 21.1{\%}, 39.5{\%}, 27.6{\%} and 11.8{\%} participants had 0, 1, 2, ≥ 3 CVD risk factors in prehypertension group, respectively. Diabetes and overweight/obesity were significantly associated with prehypertension (OR, 1.24; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.06–1.44; OR, 1.55; 95{\%} CI, 1.38–1.75) in the overall population, and diabetes was associated with prehypertension only in men (OR, 1.26; 95{\%} CI, 1.00–1.58) and older adults (OR, 1.32; 95{\%} CI, 1.03–1.69). Moreover, participants with 1, 2 and ≥3 risk factors had increased odds of having prehypertension (OR, 1.29; 95{\%} CI, 1.12–1.49; OR, 1.59; 95{\%} CI, 1.31–1.78; OR, 2.05; 95{\%} CI, 1.66–2.53, respectively) and existed dose-response relationship, regardless of age and gender. Conclusions: This study indicated that CVD risk factor clustering was significantly associated with prehypertension and hypertension. These results provide valuable information for health professionals to better understand the impact of CVD risk factor clustering on prehypertension and hypertension.",
keywords = "clustering, hypertension, Prehypertension, risk factors",
author = "Liya Tang and Qiheng Zhao and Wenwen Han and Kun Li and Junxin Li",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/10641963.2019.1652633",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Clinical and Experimental Hypertension",
issn = "1064-1963",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Association of cardiovascular risk factor clustering and prehypertension among adults:Results from the China health and retirement longitudinal study baseline

AU - Tang, Liya

AU - Zhao, Qiheng

AU - Han, Wenwen

AU - Li, Kun

AU - Li, Junxin

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: Prehypertension is common in China, but its causes and associated factors have not been well studied. This study aimed to examine the age and gender-specific associations between CVD risk factor clustering and prehypertension among adults in China. Methods: This cross-sectional study used data from participants (n = 8735) aged over 45 in the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) Baseline conducted from 2011–2012. The participants’ data were collected using standard questionnaires, anthropometric, and biochemical tests. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the associations between cardiovascular risk factors, their clustering and prehypertension. Results: Overall, 21.1%, 39.5%, 27.6% and 11.8% participants had 0, 1, 2, ≥ 3 CVD risk factors in prehypertension group, respectively. Diabetes and overweight/obesity were significantly associated with prehypertension (OR, 1.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06–1.44; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.38–1.75) in the overall population, and diabetes was associated with prehypertension only in men (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.00–1.58) and older adults (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.03–1.69). Moreover, participants with 1, 2 and ≥3 risk factors had increased odds of having prehypertension (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.12–1.49; OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.31–1.78; OR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.66–2.53, respectively) and existed dose-response relationship, regardless of age and gender. Conclusions: This study indicated that CVD risk factor clustering was significantly associated with prehypertension and hypertension. These results provide valuable information for health professionals to better understand the impact of CVD risk factor clustering on prehypertension and hypertension.

AB - Background: Prehypertension is common in China, but its causes and associated factors have not been well studied. This study aimed to examine the age and gender-specific associations between CVD risk factor clustering and prehypertension among adults in China. Methods: This cross-sectional study used data from participants (n = 8735) aged over 45 in the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) Baseline conducted from 2011–2012. The participants’ data were collected using standard questionnaires, anthropometric, and biochemical tests. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the associations between cardiovascular risk factors, their clustering and prehypertension. Results: Overall, 21.1%, 39.5%, 27.6% and 11.8% participants had 0, 1, 2, ≥ 3 CVD risk factors in prehypertension group, respectively. Diabetes and overweight/obesity were significantly associated with prehypertension (OR, 1.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06–1.44; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.38–1.75) in the overall population, and diabetes was associated with prehypertension only in men (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.00–1.58) and older adults (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.03–1.69). Moreover, participants with 1, 2 and ≥3 risk factors had increased odds of having prehypertension (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.12–1.49; OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.31–1.78; OR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.66–2.53, respectively) and existed dose-response relationship, regardless of age and gender. Conclusions: This study indicated that CVD risk factor clustering was significantly associated with prehypertension and hypertension. These results provide valuable information for health professionals to better understand the impact of CVD risk factor clustering on prehypertension and hypertension.

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KW - hypertension

KW - Prehypertension

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