Association of arsenic and metals with concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin d and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D among adolescents in Torreón, Mexico

Rachel D. Zamoiski, Eliseo Guallar, Gonzalo G. García-Vargas, Stephen J. Rothenberg, Carol E. Resnick, Marisela Rubio Andrade, Amy J. Steuerwald, Patrick J. Parsons, Virginia Marie Weaver, Ana Navas Acien, Ellen Silbergeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Limited data suggest that lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and uranium (U) may disrupt vitamin D metabolism and inhibit production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], the active vitamin D metabolite, from 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in the kidney.

Objectives: We evaluated the association between blood lead (BPb) and urine arsenic (As), Cd, molybdenum (Mo), thallium (Tl), and U with markers of vitamin D metabolism [25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D].

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 512 adolescents in Torreón, a town in Mexico with a Pb smelter near residential areas. BPb was measured using atomic absorption spectrometry. Urine As, Cd, Mo, Tl, and U were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Serum 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D were measured using a chemiluminescent immunoassay and a radioimmunoassay, respectively. Multivariable linear models with vitamin D markers as the outcome were used to estimate associations of BPb and creatinine-corrected urine As and metal concentrations with serum vitamin D concentrations, controlling for age, sex, adiposity, smoking, socioeconomic status, and time outdoors.

Results: Serum 25(OH)D was positively associated with urine Mo and Tl [1.5 (95% CI: 0.4, 2.6) and 1.2 (95% CI: 0.3, 2.1) ng/mL higher with a doubling of exposure, respectively]. Serum 1,25(OH)2D was positively associated with urine As and U [3.4 (95% CI: 0.9, 5.9) and 2.2 (95% CI: 0.7, 3.7) pg/mL higher, respectively], with little change in associations after additional adjustment for serum 25(OH)D. Pb and Cd were not associated with 25(OH)D or 1,25(OH)2D concentrations.

Conclusions: Overall, our findings did not support a negative effect of As or metal exposures on serum 1,25(OH)2D concentrations. Additional research is needed to confirm positive associations between serum 1,25(OH)2D and urine U and As concentrations and to clarify potential underlying mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1233-1238
Number of pages6
JournalEnvironmental Health Perspectives
Volume122
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

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Arsenic
Mexico
Metals
Vitamin D
Urine
Cadmium
Molybdenum
Serum
Thallium
Uranium
Adiposity
1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D
Immunoassay
Social Class
Radioimmunoassay
Linear Models
Mass Spectrometry
Creatinine
Spectrum Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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Association of arsenic and metals with concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin d and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D among adolescents in Torreón, Mexico. / Zamoiski, Rachel D.; Guallar, Eliseo; García-Vargas, Gonzalo G.; Rothenberg, Stephen J.; Resnick, Carol E.; Andrade, Marisela Rubio; Steuerwald, Amy J.; Parsons, Patrick J.; Weaver, Virginia Marie; Navas Acien, Ana; Silbergeld, Ellen.

In: Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol. 122, No. 11, 01.11.2014, p. 1233-1238.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zamoiski, Rachel D. ; Guallar, Eliseo ; García-Vargas, Gonzalo G. ; Rothenberg, Stephen J. ; Resnick, Carol E. ; Andrade, Marisela Rubio ; Steuerwald, Amy J. ; Parsons, Patrick J. ; Weaver, Virginia Marie ; Navas Acien, Ana ; Silbergeld, Ellen. / Association of arsenic and metals with concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin d and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D among adolescents in Torreón, Mexico. In: Environmental Health Perspectives. 2014 ; Vol. 122, No. 11. pp. 1233-1238.
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title = "Association of arsenic and metals with concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin d and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D among adolescents in Torre{\'o}n, Mexico",
abstract = "Background: Limited data suggest that lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and uranium (U) may disrupt vitamin D metabolism and inhibit production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], the active vitamin D metabolite, from 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in the kidney.Objectives: We evaluated the association between blood lead (BPb) and urine arsenic (As), Cd, molybdenum (Mo), thallium (Tl), and U with markers of vitamin D metabolism [25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D].Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 512 adolescents in Torre{\'o}n, a town in Mexico with a Pb smelter near residential areas. BPb was measured using atomic absorption spectrometry. Urine As, Cd, Mo, Tl, and U were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Serum 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D were measured using a chemiluminescent immunoassay and a radioimmunoassay, respectively. Multivariable linear models with vitamin D markers as the outcome were used to estimate associations of BPb and creatinine-corrected urine As and metal concentrations with serum vitamin D concentrations, controlling for age, sex, adiposity, smoking, socioeconomic status, and time outdoors.Results: Serum 25(OH)D was positively associated with urine Mo and Tl [1.5 (95{\%} CI: 0.4, 2.6) and 1.2 (95{\%} CI: 0.3, 2.1) ng/mL higher with a doubling of exposure, respectively]. Serum 1,25(OH)2D was positively associated with urine As and U [3.4 (95{\%} CI: 0.9, 5.9) and 2.2 (95{\%} CI: 0.7, 3.7) pg/mL higher, respectively], with little change in associations after additional adjustment for serum 25(OH)D. Pb and Cd were not associated with 25(OH)D or 1,25(OH)2D concentrations.Conclusions: Overall, our findings did not support a negative effect of As or metal exposures on serum 1,25(OH)2D concentrations. Additional research is needed to confirm positive associations between serum 1,25(OH)2D and urine U and As concentrations and to clarify potential underlying mechanisms.",
author = "Zamoiski, {Rachel D.} and Eliseo Guallar and Garc{\'i}a-Vargas, {Gonzalo G.} and Rothenberg, {Stephen J.} and Resnick, {Carol E.} and Andrade, {Marisela Rubio} and Steuerwald, {Amy J.} and Parsons, {Patrick J.} and Weaver, {Virginia Marie} and {Navas Acien}, Ana and Ellen Silbergeld",
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T1 - Association of arsenic and metals with concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin d and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D among adolescents in Torreón, Mexico

AU - Zamoiski, Rachel D.

AU - Guallar, Eliseo

AU - García-Vargas, Gonzalo G.

AU - Rothenberg, Stephen J.

AU - Resnick, Carol E.

AU - Andrade, Marisela Rubio

AU - Steuerwald, Amy J.

AU - Parsons, Patrick J.

AU - Weaver, Virginia Marie

AU - Navas Acien, Ana

AU - Silbergeld, Ellen

PY - 2014/11/1

Y1 - 2014/11/1

N2 - Background: Limited data suggest that lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and uranium (U) may disrupt vitamin D metabolism and inhibit production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], the active vitamin D metabolite, from 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in the kidney.Objectives: We evaluated the association between blood lead (BPb) and urine arsenic (As), Cd, molybdenum (Mo), thallium (Tl), and U with markers of vitamin D metabolism [25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D].Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 512 adolescents in Torreón, a town in Mexico with a Pb smelter near residential areas. BPb was measured using atomic absorption spectrometry. Urine As, Cd, Mo, Tl, and U were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Serum 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D were measured using a chemiluminescent immunoassay and a radioimmunoassay, respectively. Multivariable linear models with vitamin D markers as the outcome were used to estimate associations of BPb and creatinine-corrected urine As and metal concentrations with serum vitamin D concentrations, controlling for age, sex, adiposity, smoking, socioeconomic status, and time outdoors.Results: Serum 25(OH)D was positively associated with urine Mo and Tl [1.5 (95% CI: 0.4, 2.6) and 1.2 (95% CI: 0.3, 2.1) ng/mL higher with a doubling of exposure, respectively]. Serum 1,25(OH)2D was positively associated with urine As and U [3.4 (95% CI: 0.9, 5.9) and 2.2 (95% CI: 0.7, 3.7) pg/mL higher, respectively], with little change in associations after additional adjustment for serum 25(OH)D. Pb and Cd were not associated with 25(OH)D or 1,25(OH)2D concentrations.Conclusions: Overall, our findings did not support a negative effect of As or metal exposures on serum 1,25(OH)2D concentrations. Additional research is needed to confirm positive associations between serum 1,25(OH)2D and urine U and As concentrations and to clarify potential underlying mechanisms.

AB - Background: Limited data suggest that lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and uranium (U) may disrupt vitamin D metabolism and inhibit production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], the active vitamin D metabolite, from 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in the kidney.Objectives: We evaluated the association between blood lead (BPb) and urine arsenic (As), Cd, molybdenum (Mo), thallium (Tl), and U with markers of vitamin D metabolism [25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D].Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 512 adolescents in Torreón, a town in Mexico with a Pb smelter near residential areas. BPb was measured using atomic absorption spectrometry. Urine As, Cd, Mo, Tl, and U were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Serum 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D were measured using a chemiluminescent immunoassay and a radioimmunoassay, respectively. Multivariable linear models with vitamin D markers as the outcome were used to estimate associations of BPb and creatinine-corrected urine As and metal concentrations with serum vitamin D concentrations, controlling for age, sex, adiposity, smoking, socioeconomic status, and time outdoors.Results: Serum 25(OH)D was positively associated with urine Mo and Tl [1.5 (95% CI: 0.4, 2.6) and 1.2 (95% CI: 0.3, 2.1) ng/mL higher with a doubling of exposure, respectively]. Serum 1,25(OH)2D was positively associated with urine As and U [3.4 (95% CI: 0.9, 5.9) and 2.2 (95% CI: 0.7, 3.7) pg/mL higher, respectively], with little change in associations after additional adjustment for serum 25(OH)D. Pb and Cd were not associated with 25(OH)D or 1,25(OH)2D concentrations.Conclusions: Overall, our findings did not support a negative effect of As or metal exposures on serum 1,25(OH)2D concentrations. Additional research is needed to confirm positive associations between serum 1,25(OH)2D and urine U and As concentrations and to clarify potential underlying mechanisms.

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