Association of apolipoprotein A1 and B with kidney function and chronic kidney disease in two multiethnic population samples

Oemer Necmi Goek, Anna Köttgen, Ron C. Hoogeveen, Christie M. Ballantyne, Josef Coresh, Brad C. Astor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Circulating lipoproteins and their protein constituents, apolipoproteins, are risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD). The associations between apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein B and their ratio with glomerular filtration rate estimated from the new CKD Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation (eGFR) are not well studied in the general population. Methods Associations between apolipoprotein A1, B and their ratio with the outcomes of eGFR, CKD (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m2) and albuminuria were examined in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study (ARIC, n 10 292, 199698) and the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III, n = 7023, 198891). Cross-sectional multivariable-adjusted analyses were performed using linear and logistic regression. Prospective analyses related baseline apolipoprotein levels to subsequent CKD incidence over 10 years using the ARIC Carotid MRI follow-up cohort (n = 1659). Results Higher apolipoprotein A1 quartiles were associated with a lower prevalence of CKD [Q4 versus Q1: odds ratio (OR) 0.73, P-trend 0.02 in ARIC; Q4 versus Q1: OR 0.53, P-trend <0.01 in NHANES III] as well as with higher eGFR (P-trend <0.01 in ARIC and NHANES III). No consistent significant associations were found for apolipoprotein B in either study. The apolipoprotein B/A1 ratio was significantly associated with eGFR across quartiles in both studies (P-trend <0.01) and with CKD in ARIC (Q4 versus Q1: OR 1.23, P-trend = 0.01). Prospectively, there were trends for the association of apolipoproteins with incident CKD [Q4 versus Q1: incidence rate ratio (IRR) 0.68 for apolipoprotein A1, P-trend 0.1; Q4 versus Q1: IRR 1.35 for apolipoprotein B, P-trend 0.2]. Associations were not systematically stronger when comparing traditional lipids (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein or high-density lipoprotein) to apolipoproteins. Conclusions Higher serum apolipoprotein A1 was associated with lower prevalence of CKD and higher eGFR estimated by the CKD-EPI equation in two large multiethnic population-based samples. While apolipoprotein B showed no consistent associations, a higher apolipoprotein B/A1 ratio was significantly associated with lower eGFR in both studies. The direction and magnitude of the longitudinal associations between apolipoproteins and CKD incidence were overall similar to those observed cross-sectionally. No consistent differences became apparent between traditional lipids and apolipoproteins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2839-2847
Number of pages9
JournalNephrology Dialysis Transplantation
Volume27
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012

Keywords

  • ARIC
  • NHANES
  • apolipoprotein
  • chronic kidney disease
  • epidemiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Transplantation

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