Association of African-American ethnicity and smoking status with total and individual damage index in systemic lupus erythematosus

Romy Kallas, Jessica Li, Michelle Petri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Smoking has been associated with increased incidence, severity of cutaneous lupus, and lupus activity. We looked at the association of both smoking and ethnicity with the individual damage items from the SLICC/ACR Damage Index. Methods: Poisson regression was used to model the total SLICC/ACR Damage Index score against ever smoking. Cox regression was used to assess the relationship between time to individual damage items and ever smoking. Furthermore, we compared SLICC/ACR Damage Index items among African-American and Caucasian ever smokers. Results: The study included 2629 patients, 52.6% Caucasian and 39.3% African-American. The prevalence of ever smokers was 35.8%. There was no significant difference in total SLICC/ACR Damage Index score between ever smokers and never smokers after adjustment for ethnicity, gender, age at diagnosis, and years of education. Ever smokers had more atherosclerotic cardiovascular damage and skin damage compared to non-smokers. Caucasian SLE patients who ever smoked were more likely to have muscle atrophy and atherosclerosis compared to Caucasian non-smokers. African-American patients who ever smoked were more likely to have skin damage compared to African-American non-smokers. African-Americans who smoked were more likely to have many more damage items (cataract, renal damage, pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathy, deforming or erosive arthritis, avascular necrosis, skin damage, and diabetes) compared to Caucasians who smoked. Conclusion: Our analysis proved the major effect of smoking on cardiovascular and cutaneous damage. Surprisingly, cardiovascular damage items had higher hazard ratios in Caucasian smokers than non-smokers while skin damage items hazard ratios were higher in African-American smokers compared to non-smokers.Key Points• This study is the largest cohort study to date evaluating the effect of smoking on the cumulative SLICC/ACR Damage Index and its individual damage items.• It is the only study that examined the effect of smoking on individual items of the SLICC/ACR Damage Index in terms of Caucasians vs. African-American ethnicity.• Our analysis proved the major effect of smoking on cardiovascular and cutaneous damage. Compared to non-smokers, Caucasian smokers had higher risk of cardiovascular damage while African-American smokers had more skin damage.• African-Americans who smoked were more likely to have many more damage items (cataract, renal damage, pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathy, deforming or erosive arthritis, avascular necrosis, skin damage, and diabetes) compared to Caucasians who smoked.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)365-373
Number of pages9
JournalClinical rheumatology
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2020

Keywords

  • Ethnicity
  • SLICC/ACR Damage Index
  • Smoking
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

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