Association between vertigo, cognitive and psychiatric conditions in US children: 2012 National Health Interview Survey

Robin T. Bigelow, Yevgeniy R. Semenov, Howard J. Hoffman, Yuri Agrawal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Small studies have suggested an association between vertigo and psychiatric comorbidity. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the associations between vertigo and cognitive and psychiatric conditions among a large sample of U.S. children. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Child Balance Supplement administered to parents/caregivers of children aged 3–17 years. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association between vertigo and specific cognitive and psychiatric conditions. Results: The 1-year prevalence of vertigo was 1.56% in this nationally-representative sample (N = 10,823) of U.S. children aged 3–17 years. After adjusting for demographic and confounding health variables (otitis media and headaches/migraine), children with vertigo had significantly higher odds of attention deficit disorder (OR = 1.73, 95%CI: 1.06–2.81), learning disability (OR = 3.45, CI: 2.18), developmental delay (OR = 2.59, CI: 1.34–4.98), intellectual disability (OR = 6.60, CI: 2.60–16.79), and are more likely to utilize special education services (OR = 2.46, CI: 1.48–4.10) relative to the rest of U.S. children. Children with vertigo also had higher odds of having difficulty with emotions, concentration, or behavior (OR = 2.92, CI 1.85–4.61), and having a poor attention span (OR = 1.68, CI: 1.01–2.80). Conclusions: Vertigo is associated with significantly increased odds of cognitive and psychiatric comorbidity in U.S. children. These findings support the hypothesis that the vestibular system is important for normal cognitive and psychiatric development in children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number109802
JournalInternational Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Volume130
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2020

Fingerprint

Vertigo
Health Surveys
Psychiatry
Interviews
Comorbidity
Logistic Models
Special Education
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Learning Disorders
Otitis Media
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Child Development
Migraine Disorders
Intellectual Disability
Caregivers
Emotions
Cross-Sectional Studies
Parents
Demography
Health

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Pediatrics
  • Psychiatry
  • Vertigo
  • Vestibular

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Association between vertigo, cognitive and psychiatric conditions in US children : 2012 National Health Interview Survey. / Bigelow, Robin T.; Semenov, Yevgeniy R.; Hoffman, Howard J.; Agrawal, Yuri.

In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, Vol. 130, 109802, 03.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objectives: Small studies have suggested an association between vertigo and psychiatric comorbidity. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the associations between vertigo and cognitive and psychiatric conditions among a large sample of U.S. children. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Child Balance Supplement administered to parents/caregivers of children aged 3–17 years. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association between vertigo and specific cognitive and psychiatric conditions. Results: The 1-year prevalence of vertigo was 1.56{\%} in this nationally-representative sample (N = 10,823) of U.S. children aged 3–17 years. After adjusting for demographic and confounding health variables (otitis media and headaches/migraine), children with vertigo had significantly higher odds of attention deficit disorder (OR = 1.73, 95{\%}CI: 1.06–2.81), learning disability (OR = 3.45, CI: 2.18), developmental delay (OR = 2.59, CI: 1.34–4.98), intellectual disability (OR = 6.60, CI: 2.60–16.79), and are more likely to utilize special education services (OR = 2.46, CI: 1.48–4.10) relative to the rest of U.S. children. Children with vertigo also had higher odds of having difficulty with emotions, concentration, or behavior (OR = 2.92, CI 1.85–4.61), and having a poor attention span (OR = 1.68, CI: 1.01–2.80). Conclusions: Vertigo is associated with significantly increased odds of cognitive and psychiatric comorbidity in U.S. children. These findings support the hypothesis that the vestibular system is important for normal cognitive and psychiatric development in children.",
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