Association between the Use of Social Media and Photograph Editing Applications, Self-esteem, and Cosmetic Surgery Acceptance

Jonlin Chen, Masaru Ishii, Kristin L. Bater, Halley Darrach, David Liao, Pauline P. Huynh, Isabel P. Reh, Jason C. Nellis, Anisha R. Kumar, Lisa Earnest Ishii

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Importance: Social media platforms and photograph (photo) editing applications are increasingly popular sources of inspiration for individuals interested in cosmetic surgery. However, the specific associations between social media and photo editing application use and perceptions of cosmetic surgery remain unknown. Objective: To assess whether self-esteem and the use of social media and photo editing applications are associated with cosmetic surgery attitudes. Design, Setting, and Participants: A population-based survey study was conducted from July 1 to September 19, 2018. The web-based survey was administered through online platforms to 252 participants. Main Outcomes and Measures: Each participant's self-esteem was measured using the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (scores range from 0-30; higher scores indicate higher self-esteem) and the Contingencies of Self-worth Scale (scores range from 1-7; higher scores indicate higher self-worth). Cosmetic surgery attitude was measured using the Acceptance of Cosmetic Surgery Scale (scores range from 1-7; higher scores indicate higher acceptance of cosmetic surgery). Unpaired, 2-tailed t tests were used to assess the significance of self-esteem and cosmetic surgery attitude score differences among users of various social media and photo editing applications. Structural equation modeling was used to assess the association between social media investment and cosmetic surgery attitudes. Results: Of the 252 participants, 184 (73.0%) were women, 134 (53.2%) reported themselves to be white, and the mean age was 24.7 (range, 18-55) years. Scores on the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale from users and nonusers across applications were compared, with lower self-esteem scores noted in participants who reported using YouTube (difference in scores,-1.56; 95% CI,-3.01 to-0.10), WhatsApp (difference in scores,-1.47; 95% CI,-2.78 to-0.17), VSCO (difference in scores,-3.20; 95% CI,-4.98 to-1.42), and Photoshop (difference in scores,-2.92; 95% CI,-5.65 to-0.19). Comparison of self-esteem scores for participants who reported using other social media and photo editing applications yielded no significant differences. Social media investment had a positive association with consideration of cosmetic surgery (R, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.04-0.66). A higher overall score on the Acceptance of Cosmetic Surgery Scale was noted in users of Tinder (difference in means, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.34-1.23), Snapchat (difference in means, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.71), and/or Snapchat photo filters (difference in means, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.16-0.72). Increased consideration of cosmetic surgery but not overall acceptance of surgery was noted in users of VSCO (difference in means, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.32-1.35) and Instagram photo filters (difference in means, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.01-0.76) compared with nonusers. Conclusions and Relevance: This study's findings suggest that the use of certain social media and photo editing applications may be associated with increased acceptance of cosmetic surgery. These findings can help guide future patient-physician discussions regarding cosmetic surgery perceptions, which vary by social media or photo editing application use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJAMA Facial Plastic Surgery
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Social Media
Plastic Surgery
Self Concept

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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Association between the Use of Social Media and Photograph Editing Applications, Self-esteem, and Cosmetic Surgery Acceptance. / Chen, Jonlin; Ishii, Masaru; Bater, Kristin L.; Darrach, Halley; Liao, David; Huynh, Pauline P.; Reh, Isabel P.; Nellis, Jason C.; Kumar, Anisha R.; Ishii, Lisa Earnest.

In: JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, Jonlin ; Ishii, Masaru ; Bater, Kristin L. ; Darrach, Halley ; Liao, David ; Huynh, Pauline P. ; Reh, Isabel P. ; Nellis, Jason C. ; Kumar, Anisha R. ; Ishii, Lisa Earnest. / Association between the Use of Social Media and Photograph Editing Applications, Self-esteem, and Cosmetic Surgery Acceptance. In: JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery. 2019.
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title = "Association between the Use of Social Media and Photograph Editing Applications, Self-esteem, and Cosmetic Surgery Acceptance",
abstract = "Importance: Social media platforms and photograph (photo) editing applications are increasingly popular sources of inspiration for individuals interested in cosmetic surgery. However, the specific associations between social media and photo editing application use and perceptions of cosmetic surgery remain unknown. Objective: To assess whether self-esteem and the use of social media and photo editing applications are associated with cosmetic surgery attitudes. Design, Setting, and Participants: A population-based survey study was conducted from July 1 to September 19, 2018. The web-based survey was administered through online platforms to 252 participants. Main Outcomes and Measures: Each participant's self-esteem was measured using the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (scores range from 0-30; higher scores indicate higher self-esteem) and the Contingencies of Self-worth Scale (scores range from 1-7; higher scores indicate higher self-worth). Cosmetic surgery attitude was measured using the Acceptance of Cosmetic Surgery Scale (scores range from 1-7; higher scores indicate higher acceptance of cosmetic surgery). Unpaired, 2-tailed t tests were used to assess the significance of self-esteem and cosmetic surgery attitude score differences among users of various social media and photo editing applications. Structural equation modeling was used to assess the association between social media investment and cosmetic surgery attitudes. Results: Of the 252 participants, 184 (73.0{\%}) were women, 134 (53.2{\%}) reported themselves to be white, and the mean age was 24.7 (range, 18-55) years. Scores on the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale from users and nonusers across applications were compared, with lower self-esteem scores noted in participants who reported using YouTube (difference in scores,-1.56; 95{\%} CI,-3.01 to-0.10), WhatsApp (difference in scores,-1.47; 95{\%} CI,-2.78 to-0.17), VSCO (difference in scores,-3.20; 95{\%} CI,-4.98 to-1.42), and Photoshop (difference in scores,-2.92; 95{\%} CI,-5.65 to-0.19). Comparison of self-esteem scores for participants who reported using other social media and photo editing applications yielded no significant differences. Social media investment had a positive association with consideration of cosmetic surgery (R, 0.35; 95{\%} CI, 0.04-0.66). A higher overall score on the Acceptance of Cosmetic Surgery Scale was noted in users of Tinder (difference in means, 0.79; 95{\%} CI, 0.34-1.23), Snapchat (difference in means, 0.39; 95{\%} CI, 0.07 to 0.71), and/or Snapchat photo filters (difference in means, 0.44; 95{\%} CI, 0.16-0.72). Increased consideration of cosmetic surgery but not overall acceptance of surgery was noted in users of VSCO (difference in means, 0.84; 95{\%} CI, 0.32-1.35) and Instagram photo filters (difference in means, 0.38; 95{\%} CI, 0.01-0.76) compared with nonusers. Conclusions and Relevance: This study's findings suggest that the use of certain social media and photo editing applications may be associated with increased acceptance of cosmetic surgery. These findings can help guide future patient-physician discussions regarding cosmetic surgery perceptions, which vary by social media or photo editing application use.",
author = "Jonlin Chen and Masaru Ishii and Bater, {Kristin L.} and Halley Darrach and David Liao and Huynh, {Pauline P.} and Reh, {Isabel P.} and Nellis, {Jason C.} and Kumar, {Anisha R.} and Ishii, {Lisa Earnest}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1001/jamafacial.2019.0328",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Association between the Use of Social Media and Photograph Editing Applications, Self-esteem, and Cosmetic Surgery Acceptance

AU - Chen, Jonlin

AU - Ishii, Masaru

AU - Bater, Kristin L.

AU - Darrach, Halley

AU - Liao, David

AU - Huynh, Pauline P.

AU - Reh, Isabel P.

AU - Nellis, Jason C.

AU - Kumar, Anisha R.

AU - Ishii, Lisa Earnest

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Importance: Social media platforms and photograph (photo) editing applications are increasingly popular sources of inspiration for individuals interested in cosmetic surgery. However, the specific associations between social media and photo editing application use and perceptions of cosmetic surgery remain unknown. Objective: To assess whether self-esteem and the use of social media and photo editing applications are associated with cosmetic surgery attitudes. Design, Setting, and Participants: A population-based survey study was conducted from July 1 to September 19, 2018. The web-based survey was administered through online platforms to 252 participants. Main Outcomes and Measures: Each participant's self-esteem was measured using the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (scores range from 0-30; higher scores indicate higher self-esteem) and the Contingencies of Self-worth Scale (scores range from 1-7; higher scores indicate higher self-worth). Cosmetic surgery attitude was measured using the Acceptance of Cosmetic Surgery Scale (scores range from 1-7; higher scores indicate higher acceptance of cosmetic surgery). Unpaired, 2-tailed t tests were used to assess the significance of self-esteem and cosmetic surgery attitude score differences among users of various social media and photo editing applications. Structural equation modeling was used to assess the association between social media investment and cosmetic surgery attitudes. Results: Of the 252 participants, 184 (73.0%) were women, 134 (53.2%) reported themselves to be white, and the mean age was 24.7 (range, 18-55) years. Scores on the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale from users and nonusers across applications were compared, with lower self-esteem scores noted in participants who reported using YouTube (difference in scores,-1.56; 95% CI,-3.01 to-0.10), WhatsApp (difference in scores,-1.47; 95% CI,-2.78 to-0.17), VSCO (difference in scores,-3.20; 95% CI,-4.98 to-1.42), and Photoshop (difference in scores,-2.92; 95% CI,-5.65 to-0.19). Comparison of self-esteem scores for participants who reported using other social media and photo editing applications yielded no significant differences. Social media investment had a positive association with consideration of cosmetic surgery (R, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.04-0.66). A higher overall score on the Acceptance of Cosmetic Surgery Scale was noted in users of Tinder (difference in means, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.34-1.23), Snapchat (difference in means, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.71), and/or Snapchat photo filters (difference in means, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.16-0.72). Increased consideration of cosmetic surgery but not overall acceptance of surgery was noted in users of VSCO (difference in means, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.32-1.35) and Instagram photo filters (difference in means, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.01-0.76) compared with nonusers. Conclusions and Relevance: This study's findings suggest that the use of certain social media and photo editing applications may be associated with increased acceptance of cosmetic surgery. These findings can help guide future patient-physician discussions regarding cosmetic surgery perceptions, which vary by social media or photo editing application use.

AB - Importance: Social media platforms and photograph (photo) editing applications are increasingly popular sources of inspiration for individuals interested in cosmetic surgery. However, the specific associations between social media and photo editing application use and perceptions of cosmetic surgery remain unknown. Objective: To assess whether self-esteem and the use of social media and photo editing applications are associated with cosmetic surgery attitudes. Design, Setting, and Participants: A population-based survey study was conducted from July 1 to September 19, 2018. The web-based survey was administered through online platforms to 252 participants. Main Outcomes and Measures: Each participant's self-esteem was measured using the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (scores range from 0-30; higher scores indicate higher self-esteem) and the Contingencies of Self-worth Scale (scores range from 1-7; higher scores indicate higher self-worth). Cosmetic surgery attitude was measured using the Acceptance of Cosmetic Surgery Scale (scores range from 1-7; higher scores indicate higher acceptance of cosmetic surgery). Unpaired, 2-tailed t tests were used to assess the significance of self-esteem and cosmetic surgery attitude score differences among users of various social media and photo editing applications. Structural equation modeling was used to assess the association between social media investment and cosmetic surgery attitudes. Results: Of the 252 participants, 184 (73.0%) were women, 134 (53.2%) reported themselves to be white, and the mean age was 24.7 (range, 18-55) years. Scores on the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale from users and nonusers across applications were compared, with lower self-esteem scores noted in participants who reported using YouTube (difference in scores,-1.56; 95% CI,-3.01 to-0.10), WhatsApp (difference in scores,-1.47; 95% CI,-2.78 to-0.17), VSCO (difference in scores,-3.20; 95% CI,-4.98 to-1.42), and Photoshop (difference in scores,-2.92; 95% CI,-5.65 to-0.19). Comparison of self-esteem scores for participants who reported using other social media and photo editing applications yielded no significant differences. Social media investment had a positive association with consideration of cosmetic surgery (R, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.04-0.66). A higher overall score on the Acceptance of Cosmetic Surgery Scale was noted in users of Tinder (difference in means, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.34-1.23), Snapchat (difference in means, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.71), and/or Snapchat photo filters (difference in means, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.16-0.72). Increased consideration of cosmetic surgery but not overall acceptance of surgery was noted in users of VSCO (difference in means, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.32-1.35) and Instagram photo filters (difference in means, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.01-0.76) compared with nonusers. Conclusions and Relevance: This study's findings suggest that the use of certain social media and photo editing applications may be associated with increased acceptance of cosmetic surgery. These findings can help guide future patient-physician discussions regarding cosmetic surgery perceptions, which vary by social media or photo editing application use.

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