Association Between Sleep Problems and Perceived Cognitive Dysfunction Over 12 Months in Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis

Abbey Hughes, Aaron P. Turner, Kevin N. Alschuler, David C. Atkins, Meghan Beier, Dagmar Amtmann, Dawn M. Ehde

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Sleep problems are highly prevalent among individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS); however, the relationship between sleep problems and cognitive dysfunction is poorly understood in this population. In the present study, 163 individuals with MS and depression, fatigue, or pain completed self-report measures of sleep, cognitive dysfunction, and relevant demographic and clinical characteristics (e.g., disability severity, depressive symptomatology, pain intensity, fatigue impact) at four time points over 12 months. Mixed-effects regression demonstrated that poorer sleep was independently associated with worse perceived cognitive dysfunction (β = –0.05, p = .001), beyond the influence of depressive symptomatology. Fatigue impact was found to partially mediate this relationship. Results suggest that for individuals with MS and depression, fatigue, or pain, self-reported sleep problems are related to perceived cognitive dysfunction, and that fatigue impact accounts for part of this relationship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalBehavioral Sleep Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 13 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)

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