Association between resting heart rate and inflammatory biomarkers (High-sensitivity c-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and fibrinogen) (from the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis)

Seamus Whelton, Venkata Narla, Michael Blaha, Khurram Nasir, Roger S Blumenthal, Nancy S. Jenny, Mouaz H. Al-Mallah, Erin Donnelly Michos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Heart rate (HR) at rest is associated with adverse cardiovascular events; however, the biologic mechanism for the relation is unclear. We hypothesized a strong association between HR at rest and subclinical inflammation, given their common interrelation with the autonomic nervous system. HR at rest was recorded at baseline in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, a cohort of 4 racial or ethnic groups without cardiovascular disease at baseline and then divided into quintiles. Subclinical inflammation was measured using high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and fibrinogen. We used progressively adjusted regression models with terms for physical activity and atrioventricular nodal blocking agents in the fully adjusted models. We examined inflammatory markers as both continuous and categorical variables using the clinical cut point of ≥3 mg/L for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and the upper quartiles of fibrinogen (≥389 mg/dl) and interleukin-6 (≥1.89 pg/ml). Participants had a mean age of 62 years (SD 9.7), mean resting heart rate of 63 beats/min (SD 9.6) and were 47% men. Increased HR at rest was significantly associated with higher levels of all 3 inflammatory markers in both continuous (p for trend

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)644-649
Number of pages6
JournalThe American Journal of Cardiology
Volume113
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2014

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Fibrinogen
Interleukin-6
Atherosclerosis
Biomarkers
Heart Rate
Proteins
C-Reactive Protein
Inflammation
Autonomic Nervous System
Ethnic Groups
Cardiovascular Diseases
Exercise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Association between resting heart rate and inflammatory biomarkers (High-sensitivity c-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and fibrinogen) (from the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis)",
abstract = "Heart rate (HR) at rest is associated with adverse cardiovascular events; however, the biologic mechanism for the relation is unclear. We hypothesized a strong association between HR at rest and subclinical inflammation, given their common interrelation with the autonomic nervous system. HR at rest was recorded at baseline in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, a cohort of 4 racial or ethnic groups without cardiovascular disease at baseline and then divided into quintiles. Subclinical inflammation was measured using high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and fibrinogen. We used progressively adjusted regression models with terms for physical activity and atrioventricular nodal blocking agents in the fully adjusted models. We examined inflammatory markers as both continuous and categorical variables using the clinical cut point of ≥3 mg/L for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and the upper quartiles of fibrinogen (≥389 mg/dl) and interleukin-6 (≥1.89 pg/ml). Participants had a mean age of 62 years (SD 9.7), mean resting heart rate of 63 beats/min (SD 9.6) and were 47{\%} men. Increased HR at rest was significantly associated with higher levels of all 3 inflammatory markers in both continuous (p for trend",
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AU - Blaha, Michael

AU - Nasir, Khurram

AU - Blumenthal, Roger S

AU - Jenny, Nancy S.

AU - Al-Mallah, Mouaz H.

AU - Michos, Erin Donnelly

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