Association Between Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Proteins and Postoperative Opioid Use in Lumbar Fusion Procedure Patients: A Propensity Score-Matched Analysis

Irene B Murimi, Anna Ghambaryan, Robert Decker, Xiaomin Lu, Richard Segal, Nilsa Loyo-Berrios, Danica Marinac-Dabic, Abraham G. Hartzema

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Little is known about the effectiveness of recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins (rhBMPs) in reducing the demand for opioids after surgery. We investigated the association between rhBMP use and the likelihood of achieving opioid independence and changes in opioid demand in the first postoperative year. Methods: Using the Multi-Payer Claims Database from 2007 to 2010, patients aged >20 years who had undergone a degenerative disc disease–indicated lumbar fusion procedure and had had ≥1 opioid prescription in the 3 months before surgery were identified. Propensity score matching (1:1) of rhBMP-exposed and rhBMP-unexposed patients was used to mitigate confounding. The outcomes of interest were opioid independence and decreases in opioid doses in morphine equivalent units, assessed at 3–6 and 9–12 months after the procedure. Logistic regression and analysis of covariance models were used. Results: The data from 318 patients were analyzed. Most patients were women (61%) and aged <65 years (68%). Few had achieved opioid independence at 3–6 (n = 71; 22.3%) or 9–12 (n = 115; 36.2%) months postoperatively. During the 3–6-month window, the rhBMP group reduced their opioid use rates (estimated mean difference. −28.4 vs. −19.5; P = 0.69) and achieved opioid independence (21.4% vs. 23.3%; odds ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.54–1.56; P = 0.74) at rates that were statistically comparable to their matched comparators. Similar patterns were observed during the 9–12-month window. Conclusion: We found no evidence to suggest that rhBMP use during spinal fusion procedures is associated with either the discontinuation or decrease of opioid analgesic therapy. The continued opioid use after surgery warrants further clinical and research attention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalWorld Neurosurgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Keywords

  • Degenerative disc disease
  • Opioid epidemic
  • Opioids
  • Spinal fusion
  • Spinal surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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