Association between inflammatory-related disease burden and frailty: Results from the Women's Health and Aging Studies (WHAS) I and II

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Frailty is associated with a pro-inflammatory state, which has been characterized by elevated levels of systemic inflammatory biomarkers, but has not been related to the number of co-existing chronic diseases associated with inflammation. We sought to determine the extent to which a higher number of inflammatory-related diseases is associated with frailty and to identify the most common disease patterns associated with being frail in older adults. We performed binomial regression analyses to assess whether a higher count of inflammatory-related diseases increases the probability of frailty using data from the WHAS I and II, companion cohorts composed of 70-79-year-old community-dwelling older women in Baltimore, Maryland (n= 620). An increase of one inflammatory-related disease was associated log-linearly with frailty (Prevalence Ratio (PR) = 2.28, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.81-2.87). After adjusting for age, race, education, and smoking status, the probability of frailty remained significant (PR = 1.97, 95%CI = 1.52-2.55). In the frail population, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and depressive symptoms (Prevalence = 22.9%, 95%CI = 14.2-34.8%); CVD and depressive symptoms (21.7%, 95%CI = 13.2-33.5%); CKD and anemia (18.7%, 95%CI = 11.1-29.7%); cardiovascular disease (CVD), CKD, and pulmonary disease (10.7%, 95%CI = 5.2-21.0%); CKD, anemia, and depressive symptoms (8.7%, 95%CI = 3.9-18.2%); and CVD, anemia, pulmonary disease, and depressive symptoms (5.0%, 95%CI = 1.6-14.4%) were among the most frequent disease combinations. Their prevalence percentages were significantly higher in the frail versus non-frail women. A higher inflammatory-related disease count, perhaps reflecting a greater pro-inflammatory burden, increases the likelihood of frailty. Shared mechanisms among specific disease combinations may further contribute to this risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-15
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume54
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

Fingerprint

Women's Health
Confidence Intervals
Disease
health
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
confidence
Depression
Anemia
Cardiovascular Diseases
Lung Diseases
Independent Living
Frail Elderly
Baltimore
Chronic Disease
Biomarkers
Smoking
Regression Analysis
Inflammation
Education
Population

Keywords

  • Comorbidity
  • Frailty
  • Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Health(social science)
  • Gerontology

Cite this

@article{c4198501d3864da085883849284bbc61,
title = "Association between inflammatory-related disease burden and frailty: Results from the Women's Health and Aging Studies (WHAS) I and II",
abstract = "Frailty is associated with a pro-inflammatory state, which has been characterized by elevated levels of systemic inflammatory biomarkers, but has not been related to the number of co-existing chronic diseases associated with inflammation. We sought to determine the extent to which a higher number of inflammatory-related diseases is associated with frailty and to identify the most common disease patterns associated with being frail in older adults. We performed binomial regression analyses to assess whether a higher count of inflammatory-related diseases increases the probability of frailty using data from the WHAS I and II, companion cohorts composed of 70-79-year-old community-dwelling older women in Baltimore, Maryland (n= 620). An increase of one inflammatory-related disease was associated log-linearly with frailty (Prevalence Ratio (PR) = 2.28, 95{\%} Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.81-2.87). After adjusting for age, race, education, and smoking status, the probability of frailty remained significant (PR = 1.97, 95{\%}CI = 1.52-2.55). In the frail population, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and depressive symptoms (Prevalence = 22.9{\%}, 95{\%}CI = 14.2-34.8{\%}); CVD and depressive symptoms (21.7{\%}, 95{\%}CI = 13.2-33.5{\%}); CKD and anemia (18.7{\%}, 95{\%}CI = 11.1-29.7{\%}); cardiovascular disease (CVD), CKD, and pulmonary disease (10.7{\%}, 95{\%}CI = 5.2-21.0{\%}); CKD, anemia, and depressive symptoms (8.7{\%}, 95{\%}CI = 3.9-18.2{\%}); and CVD, anemia, pulmonary disease, and depressive symptoms (5.0{\%}, 95{\%}CI = 1.6-14.4{\%}) were among the most frequent disease combinations. Their prevalence percentages were significantly higher in the frail versus non-frail women. A higher inflammatory-related disease count, perhaps reflecting a greater pro-inflammatory burden, increases the likelihood of frailty. Shared mechanisms among specific disease combinations may further contribute to this risk.",
keywords = "Comorbidity, Frailty, Inflammation",
author = "Chang, {Sandy S.} and Weiss, {Carlos O.} and Xue, {Qian Li} and Fried, {Linda P.}",
year = "2012",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.archger.2011.05.020",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "54",
pages = "9--15",
journal = "Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics",
issn = "0167-4943",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association between inflammatory-related disease burden and frailty

T2 - Results from the Women's Health and Aging Studies (WHAS) I and II

AU - Chang, Sandy S.

AU - Weiss, Carlos O.

AU - Xue, Qian Li

AU - Fried, Linda P.

PY - 2012/1

Y1 - 2012/1

N2 - Frailty is associated with a pro-inflammatory state, which has been characterized by elevated levels of systemic inflammatory biomarkers, but has not been related to the number of co-existing chronic diseases associated with inflammation. We sought to determine the extent to which a higher number of inflammatory-related diseases is associated with frailty and to identify the most common disease patterns associated with being frail in older adults. We performed binomial regression analyses to assess whether a higher count of inflammatory-related diseases increases the probability of frailty using data from the WHAS I and II, companion cohorts composed of 70-79-year-old community-dwelling older women in Baltimore, Maryland (n= 620). An increase of one inflammatory-related disease was associated log-linearly with frailty (Prevalence Ratio (PR) = 2.28, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.81-2.87). After adjusting for age, race, education, and smoking status, the probability of frailty remained significant (PR = 1.97, 95%CI = 1.52-2.55). In the frail population, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and depressive symptoms (Prevalence = 22.9%, 95%CI = 14.2-34.8%); CVD and depressive symptoms (21.7%, 95%CI = 13.2-33.5%); CKD and anemia (18.7%, 95%CI = 11.1-29.7%); cardiovascular disease (CVD), CKD, and pulmonary disease (10.7%, 95%CI = 5.2-21.0%); CKD, anemia, and depressive symptoms (8.7%, 95%CI = 3.9-18.2%); and CVD, anemia, pulmonary disease, and depressive symptoms (5.0%, 95%CI = 1.6-14.4%) were among the most frequent disease combinations. Their prevalence percentages were significantly higher in the frail versus non-frail women. A higher inflammatory-related disease count, perhaps reflecting a greater pro-inflammatory burden, increases the likelihood of frailty. Shared mechanisms among specific disease combinations may further contribute to this risk.

AB - Frailty is associated with a pro-inflammatory state, which has been characterized by elevated levels of systemic inflammatory biomarkers, but has not been related to the number of co-existing chronic diseases associated with inflammation. We sought to determine the extent to which a higher number of inflammatory-related diseases is associated with frailty and to identify the most common disease patterns associated with being frail in older adults. We performed binomial regression analyses to assess whether a higher count of inflammatory-related diseases increases the probability of frailty using data from the WHAS I and II, companion cohorts composed of 70-79-year-old community-dwelling older women in Baltimore, Maryland (n= 620). An increase of one inflammatory-related disease was associated log-linearly with frailty (Prevalence Ratio (PR) = 2.28, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.81-2.87). After adjusting for age, race, education, and smoking status, the probability of frailty remained significant (PR = 1.97, 95%CI = 1.52-2.55). In the frail population, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and depressive symptoms (Prevalence = 22.9%, 95%CI = 14.2-34.8%); CVD and depressive symptoms (21.7%, 95%CI = 13.2-33.5%); CKD and anemia (18.7%, 95%CI = 11.1-29.7%); cardiovascular disease (CVD), CKD, and pulmonary disease (10.7%, 95%CI = 5.2-21.0%); CKD, anemia, and depressive symptoms (8.7%, 95%CI = 3.9-18.2%); and CVD, anemia, pulmonary disease, and depressive symptoms (5.0%, 95%CI = 1.6-14.4%) were among the most frequent disease combinations. Their prevalence percentages were significantly higher in the frail versus non-frail women. A higher inflammatory-related disease count, perhaps reflecting a greater pro-inflammatory burden, increases the likelihood of frailty. Shared mechanisms among specific disease combinations may further contribute to this risk.

KW - Comorbidity

KW - Frailty

KW - Inflammation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80054906742&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80054906742&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.archger.2011.05.020

DO - 10.1016/j.archger.2011.05.020

M3 - Article

C2 - 21763008

AN - SCOPUS:80054906742

VL - 54

SP - 9

EP - 15

JO - Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics

JF - Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics

SN - 0167-4943

IS - 1

ER -